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When I pass 'this' to an anonymous function like so:

MyClass.prototype.trigger = function(){
    window.setTimeout(function(){this.onTimeout();},1000);
}

I get a "this.onTimeout is not a function"-error. I guess that 'this' is no longer available at the time the anonymous function is executing? So I've been doing this:

MyClass.prototype.trigger = function(){
    var me = this
    window.setTimeout(function(){me.onTimeout();},1000);
}

Is this really how you're supposed to do things? It kinda works, but it feels weird.

Then we have this example:

$(function(){
    function MyClass(){
        this.queue = new Array();
    }
    MyClass.prototype.gotAnswer = function(count){
        $('body').append("count:"+count+"<br/>");
    }
    MyClass.prototype.loadAll = function(){
        var count = 0;
        var item;
        while(item = this.queue.pop()){
            count++;
            var me = this;
            $.getJSON("answer.html",{},function(data){me.gotAnswer(count);});
        }
    }

    var o = new MyClass();
    o.queue.push(1);
    o.queue.push(2);
    o.loadAll();

});

This outputs:

2
2

Shouldn't it output:

1
2

instead? Then I discovered that putting the $.getJSON-statement in another function makes it all work:

MyClass.prototype.loadAll = function(){
    var count = 0;
    var item;
    while(item = this.queue.pop()){
        count++;
        this.newRequest(count);
    }
}
MyClass.prototype.newRequest = function(count){
    var me = this;
    $.getJSON("answer.html",null,function(data){ me.gotAnswer(count); });
}

This outputs:

1
2

(Or the other way around.) What's happening here? What is the right way to pass variables to an anonnymous function?

Sorry for the confusing and lengthy post.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you are experiencing is the correct behavior - it's not a good behavior, but it's part of the language. The value of "this" is reset inside every function definition. There are four ways to call a function that have different ways of setting "this".

  1. The regular function invocation
    myFunc(param1, param2);
    This way of calling a function will always reset "this" to the global object. That's what's happening in your case.
  2. Calling it as a method
    myObj.myFunc(param1, param2);
    This unsurprisingly sets "this" to whatever object the method is being called on. Here, "this" == "myObj".
  3. Apply method invocation
    myFunc.apply(myObj, [param1, param2])
    This is an interesting one - here "this" is set to the object you pass as the first parameter to the apply method - it's like calling a method on an object that does not have that method (be careful that the function is written to be called this way). All functions by default have the apply method.
  4. As a constructor (with "new")
    myNewObj = new MyConstructor(param1, param2);
    When you call a function this way, "this" is initialized to a new object that inherits methods and properties from your function's prototype property. In this case, the new object would inherit from MyConstructor.prototype. In addition, if you don't return a value explicitly, "this" will be returned.

The solution you used is the recommended solution - assign the outside value of "this" to another variable that will still be visible inside your function. The only thing I would change is to call the variable "that" as Török Gábor says - that's sort of the de-facto standard and might make your code easier to read for other programmers.

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Cool! Thanks a lot! Hm, I guess I'm actually quite comfortible with how js works. It's kinda like LUA. It's just that I keep thinking "Java" and that doesn't really apply.. –  0scar May 27 '09 at 12:26

You are confused about the closures.

For the first problem, yes, you are right, that is the way it can be done. The only difference that there is a convention to name the variable that that holds this.

MyClass.prototype.trigger = function(){
    var that = this;
    window.setTimeout(function(){that.onTimeout();},1000);
}

There is already a nice thread about this on StackOverflow. Check answers for question How does a javascript closure work?.

Your second problem is an exact duplicate of Javascript closure inside loops - simple practical example.

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Thanks d00d! That was it : ) –  0scar May 24 '09 at 14:50

you will have the same problem if inside your new method: newRequest you have to use a "for" or a "while" statement. Another solution could be creating a closure:

like that:

$.getJSON("answer.html",{},(function(me){return function(data){me.gotAnswer(count);}})(this));
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