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#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char a, b;
    scanf("%c", &a);
    scanf("%c", &b);

    printf("%c %c",a,b);
    return 0;
}

When I run this program, I only get output as a & I don't get the prompt to enter 2nd character. Why?

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Please use more relevant/detailed titles for questions. This is not a website for psychological help. :) –  Alexey Frunze Jan 27 '12 at 20:57
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In this line,

scanf("%c", &a);

you are actually taking a %d from the stdin (standard input) but at the time you entered a character from stdin, you also typed ENTER from your keyboard which means that now you have two characters in stdin; the character itself & \n. So, the program took first character as the one you entered & second character as \n.

You need to use

scanf("%c\n", &a);

so that scanf eats the newline (that came by pressing ENTER) too.

As rodrigo suggested, you can use these too.

scanf(" %c", &a); or scanf("%c ", &a);

The way you are thinking that second character is printed is wrong. It's actually being printed but it's \n so your prompt might be coming to the next line.

Your code will work if you enter both characters without using ENTER.

shadyabhi@archlinux /tmp $ ./a.out 
qw
q wshadyabhi@archlinux /tmp $

Note, when you used this, the only thing in STDIN was q & w. So, the first scanf ate q & the second one w.

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So, does that mean I should always use "\n" while using scanf()? –  John Jan 27 '12 at 20:08
1  
Well, not so. In this case it will work, but your code will work fine if you type both chars in a single line. In that case you wouldn't need to bother about \n. –  0605002 Jan 27 '12 at 20:13
    
@FlopCoder So, space works but not \n, why? –  John Jan 27 '12 at 20:15
    
@FlopCoder No, using a space will cause second character to be space. It won't work. –  shadyabhi Jan 27 '12 at 20:17
    
My bad, I was wrong. scanf will accept any char. –  0605002 Jan 27 '12 at 20:18
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The %c is a format string which accepts only a single character. I think you pressed Enter key as soon as you pressed an alphabet key. The Enter key is also recognized as a character. So the next variable is taking the enter key which has a value of "\0".
The computer is still printing the character from the second variable but its invisible since nothing is getting printed. If you keenly observe, there will be a new line.
Enter two characters one after the other and you will be getting the right output.

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Because when you press the enter key, the resulting newline is read as a separate character into b. Try this instead:

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char a, b;
    scanf("%c %c", &a, &b);

    printf("%c %c",a,b);
    return 0;
}
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