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I have to find the average of a list in Python. This is my code so far

l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
print reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, l)

I've got it so it adds together the values in the list, but I don't know how to make it divide into them?

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7  
numpy.mean if you can afford installing numpy –  mitch Jan 27 '12 at 21:00

10 Answers 10

up vote 96 down vote accepted

If your reduce is already returning your sum, then all you have left to do is divide.

l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
print reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, l) / len(l)

though sum(l)/len(l) would be simpler, as you wouldn't need a lambda.

If you want a more exact float result instead of an int then just use float(len(l)) instead of len(l).

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5  
if the list is composed of ints, the the result under python 2 will be an int –  mitch Jan 27 '12 at 21:01
    
Well, that might be what they want. :) –  Herms Jan 27 '12 at 21:02
    
That's perfect ! sorry for the stupid question, but i've genuinely looked everywhere for that ! thank you so much ! –  Carla Dessi Jan 27 '12 at 21:03
    
"i've genuinely looked everywhere". Doubtful. The Python tutorial seems to cover this. docs.python.org/tutorial/introduction.html#numbers seems to be the relevant part on division and expressions. –  S.Lott Jan 27 '12 at 21:32
1  
as i said, i'm new to this, i was thinking i'd have to make it with a loop or something to count the amount of numbers in it, i didn't realise i could just use the length. this is the first thing i've done with python.. –  Carla Dessi Jan 27 '12 at 21:53
l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
sum(l) / float(len(l))
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22  
If you use from __future__ import division, you can eliminate that ugly float. –  S.Lott Jan 27 '12 at 21:17
2  
Agreed. float is ugly as hell, just wanted to keep it simpler. –  Yuri Prezument Jan 27 '12 at 21:28
1  
Which is why I used a comment instead of an update to the answer. –  S.Lott Jan 27 '12 at 21:31
10  
Another way of eliminate that 'ugly' float: sum(l, 0.0) / len(l) –  remosu Jun 16 '13 at 9:48

Or you could use numpy:

l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]

import numpy as np
print np.mean(l)
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Why would you use reduce() for this when Python has a perfectly cromulent sum() function?

print sum(l) / float(len(l))

(The float() is necessary to force Python to do a floating-point division.)

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1  
For those of us new to the word 'cromulent' –  RolfBly May 3 '14 at 17:56

A statistics module has been added to python 3.4. It has a function to calculate the average called mean. An example with the list you provided would be:

from statistics import mean
l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
mean(l)
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sum(l) / float(len(l)) is the right answer, but just for completeness you can compute an average with a single reduce:

>>> reduce(lambda x, y: x + y / float(len(l)), l, 0)
20.111111111111114

Note that this can result in a slight rounding error:

>>> sum(l) / float(len(l))
20.111111111111111
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That's clever, wouldn't have thought of it! –  kindall Jan 27 '12 at 21:26
    
I get that this is just for fun but returning 0 for an empty list may not be the best thing to do –  Johan Lundberg Jan 28 '12 at 0:38
1  
@JohanLundberg - You could replace the 0 with False as the last argument to reduce() which would give you False for an empty list, otherwise the average as before. –  Andrew Clark Jan 28 '12 at 0:47

In order to use reduce for taking a running average, you'll need to track the total but also the total number of elements seen so far. since that's not a trivial element in the list, you'll also have to pass reduce an extra argument to fold into.

>>> l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
>>> running_average = reduce(lambda aggr, elem: (aggr[0] + elem, aggr[1]+1), l, (0.0,0))
>>> running_average[0]
(181.0, 9)
>>> running_average[0]/running_average[1]
20.111111111111111
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1  
interesting but that's not what he asked for. –  Johan Lundberg Jan 27 '12 at 22:04
l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]

l = map(float,l)
print '%.2f' %(sum(l)/len(l))
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2  
Can you provide a description not just code? –  alexw Dec 4 '12 at 6:08
1  
Inefficient. It converts all elements to float before adding them. It's faster to convert just the length. –  Chris Koston Nov 26 '13 at 19:05
print reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, l)/(len(l)*1.0)

or like posted previously

sum(l)/(len(l)*1.0)

The 1.0 is to make sure you get a floating point division

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Instead of casting to float, you can add 0.0 to the sum:

def avg(l):
    return sum(l, 0.0) / len(l)
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