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void main()
{
    float x = 8.2;
    int r = 6;
    printf ( "%f" ,  r/4);
}

It is clearly odd that i am not explicitly typecasting the r ( of int type ) in the printf func to float. However if i change the sequence of declaring x and r and declare r first and then x i get different results(in this case it is a garbage value). Again i am not using x in the program anywhere.. These are the things i meant to be wrong... i want to keep them the way they are. But when i excute the first piece of code i get 157286.375011 as result ( a garbage value ).

void main()
{
    int r = 6;
    float x = 8.2;
    printf ( "%f" ,  r/4);
}

and if i execute the code above i get 0.000000 as result. i know results can go wrong because i am using %f in the printf when it should have been %d... the results may be wrong... but my question is why the results change when i change sequence of variable definitions. Should not it be the same whether right or wrong???

Why is this happening?

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You need #include <stdio.h>, and void main() should be int main(void) –  Keith Thompson Jan 27 '12 at 21:14
1  
Any undefined behavior is exactly that: undefined. If you want details about why undefined behavior 'behaves' a certain way, you'd probably better ask the compiler writers . . . who will probably answer "who cares?" If i had to guess, though, I would say it has to do with how many bits printf is expecting for a float, and how the bits are aligned in memory, which can be affected by declaration order. –  jpm Jan 27 '12 at 21:15
    
yes i used them in the compiler. 'Undefined' is undefined. You are right. :) thanks for answering. –  Smoking Sheriff Jan 27 '12 at 21:34

3 Answers 3

printf does not have any type checking. It relies on you to do that checking yourself, verifying that all of the types match the formatting specifiers.

If you don't do that, you enter into the realm of undefined behavior, where anything can happen. The printf function is trying to interpret the specified value in terms of the format specifier you used. And if they don't match, boom.

It's nonsense to specify %f for an int, but you already knew that...

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Or, turn on the appropriate compiler warning that does type checking for you (-Wformat for gcc). –  Greg Hewgill Jan 27 '12 at 21:12
    
Yes, there's a GCC extension for this; find out more here. Unfortunately, I don't know of any such thing for Microsoft's compiler, which is the one I use 99% of the time. –  Cody Gray Jan 27 '12 at 21:14
    
thanks man, thank you for your answer. that satisfies me to some extent...! –  Smoking Sheriff Jan 27 '12 at 21:25

f conversion specifier takes a double argument but you are passing an int argument. Passing an int argument to f conversion specifier is undefined behavior.

In this expression:

r / 4

both operands are of type int and the result is also of type int.

Here is what you want:

printf ("%f",  r / 4.0);
share|improve this answer
    
yes but wanted it to be that way... i know its odd but i don't know much about 'undefined behaviors'? Thanks for answering to my question. –  Smoking Sheriff Jan 27 '12 at 21:25
    
@user1174382 the C standard told you not to. If you insist the implementation can get "any arbitrary amount of revenge" like crashing your machine or erasing your hard drive when you run the program. That's what is undefined behavior. –  ouah Jan 27 '12 at 21:32
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Undefined_behavior and of course, nasal demons –  Cody Gray Jan 27 '12 at 21:51

When printf grabs the optional variables (i.e. the variables after the char * that tells it what to print), it has to get them off the stack. double is usually 64 bits (8 bytes) whereas int is 32 bits (4 bytes).

Moreover, floating point numbers have an odd internal structure as compared to integers.

Since you're passing an int in place of a double, printf is trying to get 8 bytes off the stack instead of four, and it's trying to interpret the bytes of a int as the bytes of a double.

So not only are you getting 4 bytes of memory containing no one knows what, but you're also interpreting that memory -- that's 4 bytes of int and 4 bytes of random stuff from nowhere -- as if it were a double.

So yeah, weird things are going to happen. When you re-compile (or even times re-run) a program that just wantonly picks things out of memory where it hasn't malloc'd and it hasn't stored, you're going to get unpredictable and wildly-changing values.

Don't do it.

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1  
that was really useful! thank you man! –  Smoking Sheriff Jan 27 '12 at 21:37

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