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This Code:

Something = new Guid() 

is returning:

00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000

all the time and I can't tell why? So, why?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 118 down vote accepted

You should use Guid.NewGuid()

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1  
@Ante: If you have the Guid class then you have the NewGuid method. –  Guffa May 24 '09 at 16:07
3  
Something = Guid.NewGuid() works. –  Dustin Campbell May 24 '09 at 16:17

Just a quick explanation for why you need to call NewGuid as opposed to using the default constructor... In .NET all structures (value types like int, decimal, Guid, DateTime, etc) must have a default parameterless constructor that initializes all of the fields to their default value. In the case of Guid, the bytes that make up the Guid are all zero. Rather than making a special case for Guid or making it a class, they use the NewGuid method to generate a new "random" Guid.

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4  
Relevant MSDN link: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/83fhsxwc(VS.80).aspx –  Jason May 24 '09 at 16:03

It's in System.Guid.

To dynamically create a GUID in code:

Guid messageId = System.Guid.NewGuid();

To see its value:

string x = messageId.ToString();
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Yes, it should be there (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.guid_members.aspx) but I can't use it. Why? –  Ante May 24 '09 at 16:06
    
"I can't use it" - what happens when you try to use it? Type it out manually (perhaps there's an issue with your intellisense) and try to compile - do you get compilation errors? –  Matthew Brindley May 24 '09 at 16:14
    
What do you mean when you say you "can't use it"? If you type Guid x = System.Guid.NewGuid() and compile, do you get an error? Or do you not like the value you're getting for x? –  DOK May 24 '09 at 16:17
    
I restared my machine and now it works fine. –  Ante May 24 '09 at 16:21
    
LOL yea that Guid algorithm sometimes needs a fresh reboot. Sigh. –  Josh Jul 21 '11 at 21:42
 Guid g1 = Guid.NewGuid();

 string s1;
 s1 = g1.ToString();
 Console.WriteLine("{0}",s1);
 Console.ReadKey();
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something = new Guid() equals something = Guid.Empty.

Use Guid.NewGuid(); instead

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protected by Daniel A. White Sep 26 '12 at 13:58

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