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for files in $(find . -maxdepth 1 -type f); do
  echo $(basename $files)
done

Works when its copy/inserted into the console, but when ran as a shell script, it returns

'/TEST.sh: line 1: syntax error near unexpected token `do
'/TEST.sh: line 1: `for files in $(find . -maxdepth 1 -type f); do

EDIT:

Attempt 2 with #!/bin/sh added to the first line now results

-bash: /oper/text2pdf_TEST.sh: /bin/sh^M: bad interpreter: No such file or directory

However /bin/sh does exist

Attempt 3 with #!/bin/bash added to the first line now results

-bash: /oper/text2pdf_TEST.sh: /bin/bash^M: bad interpreter: No such file or directory

However /bin/bash does exist

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2  
(after answering): +1 for including the exact verbatim error which is the only way this question could possibly be answered correctly. –  Ben Jackson Jan 27 '12 at 21:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your error is the big hint: Notice that it wants to say

...near unexpected token `do'

but the closing tick is at the beginning of the line. That's because the token it's printing is do^M (do followed by a carriage return).

You probably edited the file in a DOS/Windows style editor. It needs to have UNIX style line endings.

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... you're probably right. I edited it in editplus on my local machine (windows xp) then moved it to the linux box... –  Mechaflash Jan 27 '12 at 21:45

Well, the error message says what's wrong:

/bin/sh^M: bad interpreter: No such file or directory

your editor puts an extra character ^M (code 13) after /bin/sh. Configure your editor so that it ends lines in the correct way.

It is also possible that you edit the file on an operating system which ends lines with CR+LF and then copy it over to an operating system which uses LF only. See this wikipedia article on some background on this newline confusion.

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This is very common on Cygwin, a Unix-like emulation layer that runs on top of Windows. The dos2unix command will convert a Windows-format text file (with CR-LF line terminators) to the Unix-style format (with LF line terminators) that the shell requires. Read the man page carefully; unlike most text filter programs, dos2unix replaces the file in place. –  Keith Thompson Jan 27 '12 at 22:03
    
@KeithThompson That's right. Including the inplace warning! Thanks! –  Adam Zalcman Jan 27 '12 at 22:04
    
If you don't have dos2unix, this should work: tr -d '\r' < Test.sh > tmp ; mv tmp Test.sh ; chmod +x Test.sh –  Keith Thompson Jan 27 '12 at 22:04

Without a shebang, your script is executed by /bin/sh. Depending on the system, sh might not support the $(...) syntax.

Add

#!/bin/bash

as the first line of the script.

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updated my script with #!/bin/bash in first line, and outputs another error –  Mechaflash Jan 27 '12 at 21:43
    
That wasn't the problem, but I'll leave this answer here because it might help others. –  Keith Thompson Jan 27 '12 at 22:05
#!/bin/sh
for files in $(find . -maxdepth 1 -type f); do
  echo $(basename $files)
done

This one works fine for me. Maybe you forgot the Shebang (The first line specifying the interpreter)?

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updated my script with #!/bin/sh in first line, and outputs another error –  Mechaflash Jan 27 '12 at 21:44

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