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I am trying to read a CSV file with accented characters with Python (only French and/or Spanish characters). Based on the Python 2.5 documentation for the csvreader (http://docs.python.org/library/csv.html), I came up with the following code to read the CSV file since the csvreader supports only ASCII.

def unicode_csv_reader(unicode_csv_data, dialect=csv.excel, **kwargs):
    # csv.py doesn't do Unicode; encode temporarily as UTF-8:
    csv_reader = csv.reader(utf_8_encoder(unicode_csv_data),
                            dialect=dialect, **kwargs)
    for row in csv_reader:
        # decode UTF-8 back to Unicode, cell by cell:
        yield [unicode(cell, 'utf-8') for cell in row]

def utf_8_encoder(unicode_csv_data):
    for line in unicode_csv_data:
        yield line.encode('utf-8')

filename = 'output.csv'
reader = unicode_csv_reader(open(filename))
try:
    products = []
    for field1, field2, field3 in reader:
        ...

Below is an extract of the CSV file I am trying to read:

0665000FS10120684,SD1200IS,Appareil photo numérique PowerShot de 10 Mpx de Canon avec trépied (SD1200IS) - Bleu
0665000FS10120689,SD1200IS,Appareil photo numérique PowerShot de 10 Mpx de Canon avec trépied (SD1200IS) - Gris
0665000FS10120687,SD1200IS,Appareil photo numérique PowerShot de 10 Mpx de Canon avec trépied (SD1200IS) - Vert
...

Even though I try to encode/decode to UTF-8, I am still getting the following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File ".\Test.py", line 53, in <module>
    for field1, field2, field3 in reader:
  File ".\Test.py", line 40, in unicode_csv_reader
    for row in csv_reader:
  File ".\Test.py", line 46, in utf_8_encoder
    yield line.encode('utf-8', 'ignore')
UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xc3 in position 68: ordinal not in range(128)

How do I fix this? Could someone please help me with this? This is driving me insane.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 58 down vote accepted

The .encode method gets applied to a Unicode string to make a byte-string; but you're calling it on a byte-string instead... the wrong way 'round! Look at the codecs module in the standard library and codecs.open in particular for better general solutions for reading UTF-8 encoded text files. However, for the csv module in particular, you need to pass in utf-8 data, and that's what you're already getting, so your code can be much simpler:

import csv

def unicode_csv_reader(utf8_data, dialect=csv.excel, **kwargs):
    csv_reader = csv.reader(utf8_data, dialect=dialect, **kwargs)
    for row in csv_reader:
        yield [unicode(cell, 'utf-8') for cell in row]

filename = 'da.csv'
reader = unicode_csv_reader(open(filename))
for field1, field2, field3 in reader:
  print field1, field2, field3

PS: if it turns out that your input data is NOT in utf-8, but e.g. in ISO-8859-1, then you do need a "transcoding" (if you're keen on using utf-8 at the csv module level), of the form line.decode('whateverweirdcodec').encode('utf-8') -- but probably you can just use the name of your existing encoding in the yield line in my code above, instead of 'utf-8', as csv is actually going to be just fine with ISO-8859-* encoded bytestrings.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Alex! It works! :) –  Martin May 24 '09 at 21:23
1  
Does this mean the example in the python docs (where OP copy & pasted from) is wrong? What is the point of the extra encoding step it does if it breaks when you give it a unicode csv? –  Anentropic Mar 6 at 16:21

Python 2.X

There is a unicode-csv library which should solve your problems, with added benefit of not naving to write any new csv-related code.

Here is a example from their readme:

  >>> import unicodecsv
  >>> from cStringIO import StringIO
  >>> f = StringIO()
  >>> w = unicodecsv.writer(f, encoding='utf-8')
  >>> w.writerow((u'é', u'ñ'))
  >>> f.seek(0)
  >>> r = unicodecsv.reader(f, encoding='utf-8')
  >>> row = r.next()
  >>> print row[0], row[1]
  é ñ

Python 3.X

In python 3 this is supported out of the box by the build-in csv module. See this example:

 import csv
 with open('some.csv', newline='', encoding='utf-8') as f:
     reader = csv.reader(f)
     for row in reader:
         print(row)
share|improve this answer

The link to the help page is the same for python 2.6 and as far as I know there was no change in the csv module since 2.5 (besides bug fixes). Here is the code that just works without any encoding/decoding (file da.csv contains the same data as the variable data). I assume that your file should be read correctly without any conversions.

test.py:

## -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
#
# NOTE: this first line is important for the version b) read from a string(unicode) variable
#

import csv

data = \
"""0665000FS10120684,SD1200IS,Appareil photo numérique PowerShot de 10 Mpx de Canon avec trépied (SD1200IS) - Bleu
0665000FS10120689,SD1200IS,Appareil photo numérique PowerShot de 10 Mpx de Canon avec trépied (SD1200IS) - Gris
0665000FS10120687,SD1200IS,Appareil photo numérique PowerShot de 10 Mpx de Canon avec trépied (SD1200IS) - Vert"""

# a) read from a file
print 'reading from a file:'
for (f1, f2, f3) in csv.reader(open('da.csv'), dialect=csv.excel):
    print (f1, f2, f3)

# b) read from a string(unicode) variable
print 'reading from a list of strings:'
reader = csv.reader(data.split('\n'), dialect=csv.excel)
for (f1, f2, f3) in reader:
    print (f1, f2, f3)

da.csv:

0665000FS10120684,SD1200IS,Appareil photo numérique PowerShot de 10 Mpx de Canon avec trépied (SD1200IS) - Bleu
0665000FS10120689,SD1200IS,Appareil photo numérique PowerShot de 10 Mpx de Canon avec trépied (SD1200IS) - Gris
0665000FS10120687,SD1200IS,Appareil photo numérique PowerShot de 10 Mpx de Canon avec trépied (SD1200IS) - Vert
share|improve this answer

Looking at the Latin-1 unicode table, I see the character code 00E9 "LATIN SMALL LETTER E WITH ACUTE". This is the accented character in your sample data. A simple test in Python shows that UTF-8 encoding for this character is different from the unicode (almost UTF-16) encoding.

>>> u'\u00e9'
u'\xe9'
>>> u'\u00e9'.encode('utf-8')
'\xc3\xa9'
>>>

I suggest you try to encode("UTF-8") the unicode data before calling the special unicode_csv_reader(). Simply reading the data from a file might hide the encoding, so check the actual character values.

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Using codecs.open as Alex Martelli suggested proved to be usefull to me.

import csv, codecs

delimiter = ';'
reader = codecs.open("your_filename.csv", 'r', encoding='utf-8')
for line in reader:
    row = line.split(delimiter)
    #do something with your row ...
share|improve this answer
    
It wouldn't work with all CSV, following is a valid csv row: "Foo Bar; Baz"; 231; 313; ";;;"; 1; –  jb. Feb 9 '13 at 9:34

Also checkout the answer in this post: http://stackoverflow.com/a/9347871/1338557

It suggests use of library called ucsv.py. Short and simple replacement for CSV written to address the encoding problem(utf-8) for Python 2.7. Also provides support for csv.DictReader

Edit: Adding sample code that I used:

import ucsv as csv

#Read CSV file containing the right tags to produce
fileObj = open('awol_title_strings.csv', 'rb')
dictReader = csv.DictReader(fileObj, fieldnames = ['titles', 'tags'], delimiter = ',', quotechar = '"')
#Build a dictionary from the CSV file-> {<string>:<tags to produce>}
titleStringsDict = dict()
for row in dictReader:
    titleStringsDict.update({unicode(row['titles']):unicode(row['tags'])})
share|improve this answer
    
you should put some details of that link in your answer, just in case the link goes broken\ –  Yaje Jul 17 at 2:34
    
#Downvoter- Not sure why you thought its of no use. The ucsv library worked just fine for me. Helped resolve the unicde error that I had been struggling with since 2 days. If you were looking for some sample code, here it goes in the edit @Yaje- I have given some details; also the sample code. And corrected the link as well, that was earlier pointing to some other post. –  Atripavan Jul 17 at 3:05

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