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I'm trying to grep from a directory and limit the search to the first 100 results. The following code keeps yielding

[..]
grep: writing output: Broken pipe
grep: writing output: Broken pipe
grep: writing output: Broken pipe
grep: writing output: Broken pipe
[..]

The code:

p_grep = Popen(['/bin/bash', '-c', 'grep -F  "asdasdasd" data/*'], stdout = PIPE)
p_head = Popen(['head', '-100'], stdin = p_grep.stdout, stdout = PIPE)
output = p_head.communicate()[0]

How to fix it?

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@xkrz, isn't the suggested solution there exactly what he's doing? –  Rob Wouters Jan 27 '12 at 21:56
    
Do you need to execute grep or is this only an example? Otherwise, grep has a --max-count option you can use instead of piping the whole output through. –  GaretJax Jan 27 '12 at 21:58
    
max-count limits the number of rows read in a file, i need to limit the number of searches from all files. –  pistacchio Jan 27 '12 at 22:15
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@RobWouters, you are right, the example given at the end is exactly what pistcchio doing. My apology for not reading the other post to the end. –  xkrz Jan 27 '12 at 22:26
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2 Answers 2

Actually in this case you can do:

output = check_output(['/bin/bash', '-c', 'grep -F  "asdasdasd" data/* | head -100'])
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the problem with this is that, i don't know why, it executes ALL the grepping and then it pipes throu head, so, while in the shell it only takes some seconds, it takes much longer in python –  pistacchio Jan 27 '12 at 22:11
    
@pistacchio, can you try passing --line-buffered to grep and see if that changes anything? –  Rob Wouters Jan 27 '12 at 22:22
    
i tried that and no, it does not change :( –  pistacchio Jan 27 '12 at 22:23
    
I can't think of any reasons why there would be a difference. Are you absolutely certain you are comparing the exact same commands? The only other thing is maybe pass bufsize=1 to check_output. –  Rob Wouters Jan 27 '12 at 22:32
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According to the Popen documentation on writing pipes you should make sure to close the stdout on the piped processes (in this case p_grep) so that they are able to receive a SIGPIPE from the piped-to processes (in this case p_head).

Furthermore, according to this post, it's important to provide a setup function to each subprocess so that Python's handling of SIGPIPE is restored to its default behavior.

So the code becomes:

def preexec_fn():
    import signal
    signal.signal(signal.SIGPIPE, signal.SIG_DFL)

p_grep = Popen(['/bin/bash', '-c', 'grep -F  "asdasdasd" data/*'], stdout=PIPE, preexec_fn=preexec_fn)
p_head = Popen(['head', '-100'], stdin=p_grep.stdout, stdout=PIPE, preexec_fn=preexec_fn)
p_grep.stdout.close()
output = p_head.communicate()[0]

That should cause the grep process to terminate once head completes.

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