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I have only been able to find one way for functions to take a variable amount of arguments.
It's this way:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdarg.h>

using namespace std;

void Print(int argumentAmount, ... );

int main()
{
    Print(5,11,22,33,44,55);
}

void Print(int argumentAmount, ... ){

    va_list arguments; 
    va_start(arguments, argumentAmount);

    int parameter;
    for(int i = 0; i < argumentAmount; ++i ){
        parameter = va_arg(arguments, int);
        cout << parameter << endl;
    }

    va_end(arguments);
    return;
}

2 Problems:
1.) I have to specify how many arguments I'm sending in- not desirable
2.) I can't figure out how to modify it so it will output strings.

Would something like this be possible without having to overload the function multiple times:

void Output(/*not sure how this would look*/);

int main(){

    Output("hello","world");
    Output("this","is","a","test");
    Output("As","many","strings","as","you","want","may","be","passed","in");

    return 0;
}
void Output(/*not sure how this would look*/){

    //loop through each string passed in and output it
}

What about this:

void Capitalize(/*all passed by reference*/);

int main(){

    string s1 = "hello";
    string s2 = "world";

    string s3 = "this";
    string s4 = "is";
    string s5 = "a";
    string s6 = "test";

    string s7 = "as";
    string s8 = "many";
    string s9 = "strings";
    string s10 = "as";
    string s11 = "you";
    string s12 = "want";

    Capitalize(s1,s2);
    Capitalize(s3,s4,s5,s6);
    Capitalize(s7,s8,s9,s10,s11,s12);

    return 0;
}
void Capitalize(/*all passed by reference*/){

    //capitalize each string passed in

}

All I can think to do is:
-overload the function multiple times
-have the function accept some type of container instead

If this is NOT POSSIBLE, could someone explain why the compiler is not capable of accomplishing a task like this.
Thanks for the help.

share|improve this question
    
Uh, the solution you provided at the top is the answer to the two questions raised at the bottom. What does it mean "modify it so it will output strings"? –  Cody Gray Jan 27 '12 at 22:00
3  
So, why don't you just pass the strings around in an array or a collection of some sort? –  Cory Jan 27 '12 at 22:01
    
Been a while since I looked at C - but a quick google found this: [weblogs.asp.net/whaggard/archive/2004/07/03/172616.aspx] which illustrates the syntax pretty well. –  perfectionist Jan 27 '12 at 22:03
    
The compiler's only job is to compile C++ code. Are you asking why the C++ language doesn't have support for that syntax? –  Drew Dormann Jan 27 '12 at 22:08
    
By the way, "unlimited arguments" is a bit steep; I just found out today that C compilers are not required to support more than 127 parameters! –  Mr Lister Jan 27 '12 at 22:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

With variadic templates in C++11, you can do something like this (see the result at ideone)

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

void Output() {
    std::cout<<std::endl;
}

template<typename First, typename ... Strings>
void Output(First arg, const Strings&... rest) {
    std::cout<<arg<<" ";
    Output(rest...);
}

int main() {
    Output("I","am","a","sentence");
    Output("Let's","try",1,"or",2,"digits");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Quick and simple answer.

For C++ you need to specify either the number of arguments or a sentinel value to indicate the end of arguments.

Your first example is a good example of specing the count, you could also do:

void Print(const char *arg, ... ){
    va_list arguments;

    for (va_start(arguments, arg); arg != NULL; arg = va_arg(arguments, const char *)) {
        cout << arg << endl;
    }

    va_end(arguments);
}

Where your calling convention is:

Print("foo","bar",NULL);

If you want to take it to the next level, you can mix in a bit of the C Preprocessor and do:

#define mPrint(...) Print(__VA_ARGS__, NULL)

Now you can just say:

mPrint("fooo","bar");

And the macro will NULL terminate the call.

share|improve this answer

Instead of passing in the count, you can have a special "trailing" argument (either nullptr or a pointer to some hard-coded "magic" string) and your variable-argument functions should stop extracting more arguments once they see the trailing one. That can ease your coding a bit.

You could also pass pointers (references) to containers, containing (or pointing at/referencing) your strings. Anything that can somehow link all your individual arguments will do (e.g. a vector).

Example (might be not very idiomatic, but should serve as an illustration):

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdarg>
#include <cctype>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

void AntiCapitalize(vector<string*>& v);
void Capitalize(string* s, ...);
void Print(string* s, ...);

int main()
{
    string s1 = "hello";
    string s2 = "world";

    string s3 = "this";
    string s4 = "is";
    string s5 = "a";
    string s6 = "test";

    string s7 = "as";
    string s8 = "many";
    string s9 = "strings";
    string s10 = "as";
    string s11 = "you";
    string s12 = "want";

    Capitalize(&s1, &s2, 0);
    Capitalize(&s3, &s4, &s5, &s6, 0);
    Capitalize(&s7, &s8, &s9, &s10, &s11, &s12, 0);

    Print(&s1, &s2, 0);
    Print(&s3, &s4, &s5, &s6, 0);
    Print(&s7, &s8, &s9, &s10, &s11, &s12, 0);

    vector<string*> v;
    v.push_back(&s1);
    v.push_back(&s2);
    v.push_back(&s3);
    v.push_back(&s4);
    v.push_back(&s5);
    v.push_back(&s6);
    v.push_back(&s7);
    v.push_back(&s8);
    v.push_back(&s9);
    v.push_back(&s10);
    v.push_back(&s11);
    v.push_back(&s12);

    AntiCapitalize(v);

    Print(&s1, &s2, 0);
    Print(&s3, &s4, &s5, &s6, 0);
    Print(&s7, &s8, &s9, &s10, &s11, &s12, 0);

    return 0;
}

void Capitalize(string* s, ...)
{
    va_list ap;

    va_start(ap, s);

    while (s)
    {
        string::size_type i = 0;

        while ((*s)[i] != '\0')
        {
            (*s)[i] = toupper((*s)[i]);
            i++;
        }

        s = va_arg(ap, string*);
    }

    va_end(ap);
}

void Print(string* s, ...)
{
    va_list ap;

    va_start(ap, s);

    while (s)
    {
        cout << *s << endl;
        s = va_arg(ap, string*);
    }

    va_end(ap);
}

void AntiCapitalize(vector<string*>& v)
{
    vector<string*>::iterator it;

    for (it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); it++)
    {
        string::size_type i = 0;

        while ((**it)[i] != '\0')
        {
            (**it)[i] = tolower((**it)[i]);
            i++;
        }
    }
}

Output:

HELLO
WORLD
THIS
IS
A
TEST
AS
MANY
STRINGS
AS
YOU
WANT
hello
world
this
is
a
test
as
many
strings
as
you
want
share|improve this answer

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