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If I include the if test in my code the error message is returned and I'm not sure why. and when it's not used, my program get's stuck in a loop where it never reaches the end of the file. I don't understand what's going wrong.

int countlines()
{
    fstream myfile;
    myfile.open("questions.txt", ios::in);
    string contents;
    int linenumber = 0;

    //if (myfile.is_open())  
    // {
    while (!myfile.eof())  
    {
        getline( myfile, contents );
        if (contents != "")
        {
            linenumber++;
        }
    }
    cout << "there are " << linenumber << " lines.\n";
    //}else {cout<<"Unable to get file.\n";}

    myfile.close();
    return(linenumber);
}
share|improve this question
5  
while (!myfile.eof()) is almost always wrong. Where were you taught to do that? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 27 '12 at 22:01
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit it was the only sample code that seemed to work. so I got it off a programming website I assume! –  Bhuggy Jan 27 '12 at 22:06
1  
@Bhuggy: you probably got it from a bad online tutorial like the "file handling" tutorial on cpluscplus.com. Be careful! cplusplus.com as it sometimes gives bad advice and/or facts. –  André Caron Jan 27 '12 at 22:23
    
@Bhuggy: Reason I ask is so that I can contact the author. You should get yourself a proper C++ book which, when found on that list, are trustworthy; random tutorials on the internet are not trustworthy. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 27 '12 at 22:29
    
@AndréCaron yeah it probably was from there, most of my searches seem to end up on cplusplus forums or tutorial pages. –  Bhuggy Jan 27 '12 at 23:20

4 Answers 4

What's going on is that your file is not being opened. That's why is_open fails.

Then, when you comment out the check, you're breaking your loop because you're iterating incorrectly (see my comment) and not detecting stream failures (.eof() will never be true on that stream).

Make sure that the file is in the right place, and that it is accessible.

share|improve this answer
    
How would I make my file accessible? It's in the right place (in the program file with all the other code files) so I can only assume something's stopping it from being accessed. –  Bhuggy Jan 27 '12 at 22:11
    
Bhuggy, you're opening the file with a relative path. Are you sure your program's current working directory at the time you call countlines is really the one that contains your file? Use an absolute path, or call chdir to make sure the current directory is what you think it is. –  Rob Kennedy Jan 27 '12 at 22:19
    
@Bhuggy: It doesn't really matter where the program file is. In fact, the process doesn't even know where the program file is! What matters is the current working directory of the environment that invoked the executable. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 27 '12 at 22:30
    
@RobKennedy is there any good tutorials on using paths? I only ask as I was looking for something to easily navigate files but i couldn't really find anything that was appropriate, but maybe that's because i was looking for an easy way to do things and ignored the good stuff. –  Bhuggy Jan 27 '12 at 23:24
    
@Bhuggy: As I said before, you want a peer-reviewed book, not some "tut". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '12 at 15:32

The correct idiom for reading a file line-by-line in C++ is using a loop like this:

for (std::string line; std::getline(file,line);)
{
    // process line.
}

Inserting this in your example (+fixing indentation and variable names) gives something like this:

int countlines(const std::string& path)
{
    // Open the file.
    std::ifstream file(path.c_str());
    if (!file.is_open()) {
        return -1; // or better, throw exception.
    }

    // Count the lines.
    int count = 0;
    for (std::string line; std::getline(file,line);)
    {
        if (!line.empty()) {
            ++count;
        }
    }

    return count;
}

Note that if you don't intend to process the line contents, you can actually skip processing them using std::streambuf_iterator, which can make your code look like:

int countlines(const std::string& path)
{
    // Open the file.
    std::ifstream file(path.c_str());
    if (!file.is_open()) {
        return -1; // or better, throw exception.
    }

    // Refer to the beginning and end of the file with
    // iterators that process the file character by character.
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> current(file);
    const std::istreambuf_iterator<char> end;

    // Count the number of newline characters.
    return std::count(current, end, '\n');
}

The second version will completely bypass copying the file contents and avoid allocating large chunks of memory for long lines.

share|improve this answer

When using std::istream and std::ostream (whose std::fstream implements), the recommended usage is to directly use the stream in a bool context instead of calling eof() function because it only return true when you managed to read until the last byte of the file. If there was any error before that, the function will still return true.

So, you should have written your code as:

int countlines() {
    ifstream myfile;
    int linenumber = 0;
    string linecontent;
    myfile.open("question.txt", ios::in);
    while (getline(myfile, linecontent)) {
        if (!linecontent.empty()) {
            ++linenumber;
        }
    }
    return linenumber;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Actually it's mostly because it doesn't set eof until a read has already failed due to EOF. However, yes, you gain checks for the other flags too by testing the stream directly. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 27 '12 at 22:31
    
You're right, I've edited my response. –  Sylvain Defresne Jan 27 '12 at 22:35
    
Alright, looks good :) +1 –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '12 at 15:33

Try the following code. It will also (hopefully) give you an idea why the file open is failing...

int countlines()
{
    ifstream myfile;
    myfile.open("questions.txt");
    string contents;
    int linenumber = 0;

    if (myfile.is_open())  
    {
        while (getline(myfile, contents))  
        {
            if (contents != "")
                linenumber++;
        }
        cout << "there are " << linenumber << " lines." << endl;        
        myfile.close();
    }
    else
        cout << "Unable to get file (reason: " << strerror(errno) << ")." << endl;

    return linenumber;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The iteration is still not right. And is fstream opening failure guaranteed to set errno? Good call if so; but I'm not sure. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 27 '12 at 22:35
    
Not sure if errno is guaranteed to be set but a quick test using g++ on OS X confirms it works here and I would imagine it works on Linux too. Fingers crossed for Windows. Thought it may help the OP figure out the reason for the open failure. –  Nick Smith Jan 27 '12 at 22:54
    
Also, many thanks for your downvote. –  Nick Smith Jan 27 '12 at 22:55
    
The iteration is wrong, so you get a downvote. No need to be snippy. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 28 '12 at 15:33
    
getline() call moved into the loop condition as others have pointed out is recommended practice. –  Nick Smith Jan 29 '12 at 23:03

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