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I want to be able to look values up by a key in same cases, and in other cases iterate through the collection.

Previously I was doing this:

public class Company
{
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public ICollection<Department> Departments { get; set; }

}

public class Department
{
  public string Name       { get; set; } //display name
  public string UniqueName { get; set; } //like a code value
  public bool   IsSelected { get; set; }
}

foreach(var d in someCompany.Departments) ...

var departments = someCompany.Departments.Select( d => some projection stuff ...

Now I have several places I also need to iterate through some other collection like checkbox lists with matching strings for the UniqueName, so for it to be efficient I changed the declaration of Departments to an IDictionary, but this makes the other use cases more cumbersome, always requiring me to drill into a Value or Values. So now Departments property is no longer a collection of Department classes, but instead a collection of KeyValue pairs.

foreach(ListItem item in someCheckBoxes.Items)
{
  someCompany.Departments[item.Value].Selected = true;
}

foreach(var d in someCompany.Departments.Values) ...

var departments = someCompany.Departments.Values.Select( d => some projection stuff ...

I also don't care for having to convert Lists to IDictionary or add a KeyValue whenever I initialize these lists.

Ideally I would have a collection that behaves like an ICollection but also has an index operator and Contains a function which internally access a dictionary.

OR I would have two properties like so, that stay in sync:

public Company(string uniqueName, string name, ICollection<Department> departments)
{
  Name = name;
  UniqueName = uniqueName;
  DepartmentsByUniqueName = departments.ToDictionary<Department, string>(p => p.UniqueName);
}

public IDictionary<string,Department> DepartmentsByUniqueName { get; set;}

public ICollection<Department> Departments { get { return DepartmentsByUniqueName.Values; } }

public void AddDepartment(Department department)
{ 
  DepartmentsByUniqueName.Add(department,department.UniqueName)
}

The problem here is that someone could get the Values collection via the Departments property and add/remove items to it, not reallizing they really need to be added to the dictionary instead.(implementing set doesn't solve this because they get the cllection via the get and then can add items to it.)

Trying not to reinvent too much code, but inheriting from Dictionary automatically makes it inherit IEnumerable. Even if I do an explicit implementation of the interface, problems could occur if the user has cast it to that base interface.

So essentially I want a class that implements IEnumerable but also has a Contains and [] operators which utilize a dictionary internally for efficiency.

OR be able to create addition DepartmentByUniqueName dictionary property which stays in sync with the Departments collection.

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1  
Why not just use the dictionary's Values property when you need to iterate? –  Joe White Jan 27 '12 at 22:28
    
Because the property is called Departments, not DepartmentKeyValuePairs. It makes little semantic sense to always access a .Value or .Values in every use case when really the dictionary is simply an index . It is also unnecesary to always pass the Key to .Add. In contrast, the KeyedCollection is great because you bake that logic into the collection that says, everytime an item is added, use this property for the Key. Instead of being an ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey,TItem> it is a ICollection<TItem>. –  AaronLS Feb 2 '12 at 22:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you may want to do is to subclass KeyedCollection and define it thus:

public class DepartmentCollection : KeyedCollection<String, Department> {
    protected override String GetKeyForItem(Department item)
    {
        // EDIT: For your use case, this should work
        return item.UniqueName;
    }
}

And use it in your company class as the Departments property:

public class Company
{
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public DepartmentCollection Departments { get; set; }
}

The KeyedCollection can then be used either by name or by index:

var departments = new DepartmentCollection();
departments.Add(new Department( ... ));
var accounting = departments["Accounting"];
foreach (var department in departments) { .... } 
var accountingExists = departments.Contains("accounting");
// etc
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the KeyedCollection suggestion. I prefer this answer over mine, since it allows O(1) index lookup (as opposed to Enumerable.ElementAt, which is O(n) for non-list structures.) –  Douglas Jan 28 '12 at 13:23
    
I usually have to initialize these from some database, which usually involves ToList or ToDictionary. What is the best way to convert an IEnumerable or ICollection into a KeyedCollection? –  AaronLS Jan 31 '12 at 15:32
    
You'd need to create the DepartmentCollection, then foreach over the IEnumerable or ICollection and add each item individually. KeyedCollection doesn't have an AddAll method. Alternatively, you could add a constructor overload to your DepartmentCollection that takes an IEnumerable<Department> and does the iteration. –  Chris Shain Jan 31 '12 at 17:49

This does what you are after (I think!) You could also implement ICollection<T> and delegate the calls to the internal _storage dictionary.

public class HybridLookup<TKey, TValue> : IEnumerable<TValue>
{
    private readonly IDictionary<TKey, TValue> _storage;

    public HybridLookup()
    {
        _storage = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    }

    public TValue this[TKey key]
    {
        get { return _storage[key]; }
    }

    public Boolean Contains(TKey key)
    {
        return _storage.ContainsKey(key);
    }
    public IEnumerator<TValue> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _storage.Values.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

}
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I think the solution you suggested in your last snippet of code works fine, except for the AddDepartment method, which needs a minor correction:

public void AddDepartment(Department department)
{ 
    DepartmentsByUniqueName.Add(department.UniqueName, department);
}

Contains is already present on Dictionary<TKey, TValue>.ValueCollection, and you may use the LINQ ElementAt method instead of indexers (although it admittedly would not be as efficient).

You don’t need to worry about consumers altering your Dictionary<TKey,TValue>.Values collection, since any such attempt would raise a NotSupportedException: "Mutating a value collection derived from a dictionary is not allowed."

Here is an excerpt of the relevant code from the class:

public class Dictionary<TKey, TValue> : IDictionary<TKey, TValue>, ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>, IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>, IDictionary, ICollection, IEnumerable, ISerializable, IDeserializationCallback
{
    public Dictionary<TKey, TValue>.ValueCollection Values { get; }

    public sealed class ValueCollection : ICollection<TValue>, IEnumerable<TValue>, ICollection, IEnumerable
    {
        void ICollection<TValue>.Add(TValue item)
        {
            ThrowHelper.ThrowNotSupportedException(ExceptionResource.NotSupported_ValueCollectionSet);
        }
    }
}
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