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I'm somewhat inexperienced with C, but I'm an experienced C++ programmer. I encountered a problem in a function that our instructor provided to us for an assignment, and I've looked over information on format specifiers and sscanf in general and haven't found the error.

The problem is in this part of the function, though I'll also put the declarations for the relevant strings:

char label[MAXLINELENGTH], opcode[MAXLINELENGTH], arg0[MAXLINELENGTH],
arg1[MAXLINELENGTH], arg2[MAXLINELENGTH];

And then inside the function:

int readAndParse(FILE *inFilePtr, char *label, char *opcode, char *arg0,
         char *arg1, char *arg2)
{
   char line[MAXLINELENGTH];
   char *ptr = line;

  /* delete prior values */
  label[0] = opcode[0] = arg0[0] = arg1[0] = arg2[0] = '\0';

  /* read the line from the assembly-language file */
  if (fgets(line, MAXLINELENGTH, inFilePtr) == NULL) {
    /* reached end of file */
    return(0);
  }

  /* check for line too long (by looking for a \n) */
  if (strchr(line, '\n') == NULL) {
    /* line too long */
    printf("error: line too long\n");
    exit(1);
  }
  /* is there a label? */
  ptr = line;
  if (sscanf(ptr, "%[^\t\n ]", label)) {
    /* successfully read label; advance pointer over the label */
    ptr += strlen(label);
  }

  /*
   * Parse the rest of the line.  Would be nice to have real regular
   * expressions, but scanf will suffice.
   */
  **sscanf(ptr, "%*[\t\n ]%[^\t\n ]%*[\t\n ]%[^\t\n ]%*[\t\n ]%[^\t\n ]%*[\t\n ]%\
[^\t\n ]", opcode, arg0, arg1, arg2);**

There is more, but the problem is happening in the bolded function. After this, I printed out all of the variables that should have been extracted (plus the label that was read in above that), and only label and opcode have read in. arg0, arg1, and arg2 are all very small negative values. If it helps, arg1 is 8 less than arg0 and arg 2 is 8 less than arg1. These values are the same for every line that I parse (about 10 lines total).

All of the arg variables are equal to "\0" before sscanf happens. I checked.

Anyone know why this is going on?

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What does it mean for an array of characters to have a "very small negative value"? –  David Schwartz Jan 27 '12 at 22:49
    
The exact value changes every time I run the program, but in the run I just did, when I displayed arg0, arg1, and arg2, this is what I got (in order): -2034023152 -2034024160 -2034025168 –  user1174511 Jan 27 '12 at 22:51
    
I think you're forgetting that these are arrays that decay into pointers. Those are the memory addresses at which the strings are stored. (If you look at them before the call to sscanf, you'll see they're the same -- their location in memory hasn't changed but the contents have.) You need to look inside the array. –  David Schwartz Jan 27 '12 at 22:52
    
I just got it! That was it. I was accidentally reading the location in memory. Thanks so much for your help! –  user1174511 Jan 27 '12 at 22:54
    
BTW: if (strchr(line, '\n') == NULL) { /* line too long */ is not a definite line_too_long test. Last line in file might not end with a \n. –  chux Nov 15 '13 at 0:31
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1 Answer

I think you're forgetting that these are arrays that decay into pointers. Those are the memory addresses at which the strings are stored. (If you look at them before the call to sscanf, you'll see they're the same -- their location in memory hasn't changed but the contents have.) You need to look inside the array.

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