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I am looking over this piece of code, and am having trouble with the syntax:

struct Instance
{
    typedef glm::vec3(*OffsetFunc)(float);

    OffsetFunc CalcOffset;

    glm::mat4 ConstructMatrix(float fElapsedTime)
    {
        glm::mat4 theMat(1.0f);

        theMat[3] = glm::vec4(CalcOffset(fElapsedTime), 1.0f);

        return theMat;
    }
};

It is C++ code, related to OpenGL, but my question is not about OpenGL. The glm::vec3, vec4, mat4 are just vectors of dimension 3 and 4, and mat4 is a 4x4 square matrix. The glm library has overloaded operators so lines like:

theMat[3] = glm::vec4(CalcOffset(fElapsedTime), 1.0f);

work as you might expect, filling up the 4th column of theMat with a 4-d vector that is comprised of 1.0f and that cast or typedef or function call, I'm not exactly sure what that is, and that is my question.

What does typedef glm::vec3(*OffsetFunc)(float); and CalcOffset(fElapsedTime) mean?

I tried reading here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typedef#Using_typedef_with_type_casts , but that explanation doesn't really seem to make sense to me.

Edit: I know how typedefs work when it simply involves providing another alias for a type.

Edit 2: I thought that this might be doing something with a pointer to a function because it kind of looks like a pointer and has float in there like its a function parameter type, and it seems like this is the case, but I am still not sure what this kind of code precisely does.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
typedef glm::vec3(*OffsetFunc)(float);

defines OffsetFunc to be an alias for the type glm::vec3(*)(float), i.e. pointer to function taking float and returning glm::vec3.

CalcOffset(fElapsedTime)

calls the function pointed to by CalcOffset on fElapsedTime.

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Makes sense now, thanks! –  newprogrammer Jan 28 '12 at 0:56
    
Yeah, if you ever see this comment: Is it wrong thinking that his use of typedef here is somewhat redundant, since he only uses it once, and its declared inside the scope of this simple struct? –  newprogrammer Jan 28 '12 at 1:06
    
@newprogrammer: it's kind of redundant because it's used exactly once. Then again, defining typedefs for function pointers used at least twice is good practice, because the syntax quickly gets hard to read. –  larsmans Jan 28 '12 at 11:36

There's no cast. It's a typedef to a function pointer.

The type OffsetFunc is a pointer to a function taking a float as an argument and returning a glm::vec3.

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Good explanation, thanks –  newprogrammer Jan 28 '12 at 0:57
    
Yeah, if you ever see this comment: Is it wrong thinking that his use of typedef here is somewhat redundant, since he only uses it once, and its declared inside the scope of this simple struct? –  newprogrammer Jan 28 '12 at 1:07
    
I don't think it's wrong. Function pointer types are awkward enough that I often use typedefs for them. Defining argument lists that take function pointers without a typedef is both ugly and error prone. –  smparkes Jan 28 '12 at 1:13
typedef glm::vec3(*OffsetFunc)(float);

is one of the more obscure bits of C (and C++) syntax.

It says that the new type OffsetFunc is a pointer to a function which accepts one parameter, a float, and returns a glm::vec3.

CalcOffset(fElapsedTime)

is a function call through such a function pointer: the function pointer must be set before calling this to point to a suitable function.

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Ah that clears things up significantly. Thanks! –  newprogrammer Jan 28 '12 at 0:54
    
Yeah, if you ever see this comment: Is it wrong thinking that his use of typedef here is somewhat redundant, since he only uses it once, and its declared inside the scope of this simple struct? –  newprogrammer Jan 28 '12 at 1:07
    
@newprogrammer: I would not say it is wrong. When there is a function pointer like that, there are usually assignments to the variable which have to be cast to the same type (at least with the warning level turned up). So having the function pointer typedef declared is a handy way of writing that. –  wallyk Jan 28 '12 at 1:16
typedef glm::vec3(*OffsetFunc)(float);

Creates a typedef of a function pointer. The function returns glm::vec3 and takes a float parameter.

CalcOffset(fElapsedTime)

This is calling the function pointed to by CalcOffset with the argument fElapsedTime.

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Thanks, makes sense now –  newprogrammer Jan 28 '12 at 0:57
    
Yeah, if you ever see this comment: Is it wrong thinking that his use of typedef here is somewhat redundant, since he only uses it once, and its declared inside the scope of this simple struct? –  newprogrammer Jan 28 '12 at 1:07

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