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I had an idea to save time involving creating a temporary function to use as an argument to a function that needs it. The reason I'm after this behaviour is to do things in a new thread in an easy manner (using Win32 API) without having to define all kinds of functions I'll use.

Here's an example:

void msg (const string & message) {
    MessageBox (0, message.c_str(), "Message", 0);
}

This will produce a message box, but your program is halted until it closes. The solution is to create a thread for the message box that runs concurrently with the main thread.

void msg (const string & message) {
    CreateThread (0, 0, 
    (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)({MessageBox (0, message.c_str(), "Message", 0);}), 
    0, 0, 0);
}

In this case, LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE is defined as
typedef DWORD (*LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)(LPVOID param);

Since I have multiple functions wanting another thread for a purpose like that, putting the function in the call to CreateThread seems to be working well.

But say I wanted to use that LPVOID param. I'd like to know how standard this method is, and where I can find out how to use it for more advanced techniques. Also, I know using it in a function that will store it for later use (eg. a message loop function where you can add messages to handle and a corresponding function to call) is a bad idea as the function is temporary and would not be able to be called when needed. Is there really any use beyond things like threads where it's annoying to make one line functions elsewhere in order to use it?

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The question isn't really clear (and also that syntax is non-standard) –  Seth Carnegie Jan 28 '12 at 2:44
    
I just had the idea today: a scheme to save some time and space in the file. I was mostly wondering how safe it is to use, and if it could be used for better things than that example. –  chris Jan 28 '12 at 2:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's called a "lambda". They are very useful for many purposes beyond this and are in the C++11 Standard. You can find them in the latest GCC and MSVC. However, MSVC's current implementation does not permit conversion to a function pointer, as the Standard did not specify such a conversion at that time. VC11 will implement this conversion. This code is Standard-conforming C++11:

void msg (const string & message) {
    CreateThread (0, 0, 
    [](LPVOID* param) { MessageBox (0, message.c_str(), "Message", 0); }, 
    0, 0, 0);
}
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It's not LPVOID* (= void**), just LPVOID (= void*) (stupid Windows typedefs) –  Seth Carnegie Jan 28 '12 at 2:48
    
Thanks for the term. That should help ease the painful pages of unrelated topics when searching. One thing: LPVOID is defined as void * so there's an extra * in there. Guess Seth beat me to that one... –  chris Jan 28 '12 at 2:53

There was another way in times lambdas were not the standard - you could define function-local class and define the inner function within that class. Something like:

void msg(const string &message)
{
    struct message_box
    {
        static DWORD WINAPI display(LPVOID param)
        {
            /// do the action
            return 0;
        }
    };

    ::CreateThread(0, 0, 
        &message_box::display, 
        0, 0, 0);
}

Now lets consider your question. You wanted to pass the message text in STL's std::string. Since it occupies dynamic memory which can be freed by your initial thread, the new thread, running in parallel, must have guarantee, that the message text will still be available to it. This can be done by copying (which would work with lambda's by-value capture - [=] introducer) or sharing a reference (via reference counting, let'd say). Lets consider copying:

void msg(const string &message)
{
    struct message_box
    {
        static DWORD WINAPI display(void *param)
        {
            MessageBox(0, ((string *)param)->c_str(), "Message", 0);
            delete (string *)param;
            return 0;
        }
    };

    string *clone = new string(message);

    ::CreateThread(0, 0, 
        &message_box::display, 
        clone, 0, 0);
}

Please, note, that the copy is allocated in the initial thread and destroyed in the new one. This requires multithreading support from your CRT.

In the case new thread fails to start, you'll end up with memory being orphaned. Lets fix this:

void msg(const string &message)
{
    struct message_box
    {
        static DWORD WINAPI display(void *param)
        {
            auto_ptr<string> message((string *)param);
            MessageBox(0, message->c_str(), "Message", 0);
            return 0;
        }
    };

    auto_ptr<string> clone(new string(message));

    if (::CreateThread(0, 0, &message_box::display, clone.get(), 0, 0))
        clone.release(); // release only if the new thread starts successfully.
}

Since the memory is being managed by the CRT, the CRT have to be initialized in the new thread, which is not done by CreateThread API. You have to use CRT beginthread/beginthreadex instead:

void msg(const string &message)
{
    struct message_box
    {
        static unsigned int WINAPI display(void *param)
        {
            auto_ptr<string> message((string *)param);
            MessageBox(0, message->c_str(), "Message", 0);
            return 0;
        }
    };

    auto_ptr<string> clone(new string(message));

    if (_beginthreadex(0, 0, &message_box::display, clone.get(), 0, 0))
        clone.release(); // release only if the new thread starts successfully.
}

This solution leaves aside the problem of the thread itself being leaked as a resource. But, I believe you may find another posts for this on stackoverflow.com :)

thanks )

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1  
The issue with CreateThread and the C runtime was consigned to history a long time ago. –  David Heffernan Jan 28 '12 at 8:59

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