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In the code sample below, I would expect the output to be as follows, since x is a static constexpr variable.

5
5
5
5

However, g++ warns me that x is uninitialized inside the lambda function when I compile with -Wall, and the last three lines of the output vary, presumably because the value of uninitialized memory on the stack is being printed. Here is one possible output produced by the program when it is compiled with the options -Wall -std=c++0x. Why is the output not what I expect it to be?

5
32718
32718
32718

If it helps, the expected output is produced when constexpr is deleted in the declaration constexpr T x.

Example Program

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

struct _foo
{
        template <class T>
        struct traits
        {
                static constexpr T val = 5;
        };

        template <class T>
        constexpr T getval() const { return traits<T>::val; }
} foo;

struct _test
{
        template <class T>
        void bar(const T& t)
        {
                int arr[] = { 1, 2, 3 };
                constexpr T x = foo.getval<T>();
                std::cout << x << std::endl;
                std::for_each(arr, arr + 3, [&](int i) {
                        std::cout << x << std::endl;
                });
        }
} test;

int main()
{
        test.bar(5u);
        return 0;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This was indeed a compiler bug. I reported it here, and it was confirmed a while ago. It doesn't crash on older versions of g++, because the constexpr keyword is just parsed and ignored.

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You have to capture x in the lambda's capture list:

std::for_each(arr, arr + 3, [&](int i) { // notice the & (capture the outside env
                                         // by reference
    std::cout << x << std::endl;
});
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I just added that as you posted this answer. Same problem. –  void-pointer Jan 28 '12 at 3:03
    
@void-pointer hmm, I can't reproduce the problem. See ideone.com/DHJUG –  Seth Carnegie Jan 28 '12 at 3:06
    
I'm using g++ 4.6.1 on Linux Mint 64-bit. Also, the fact that it's not reported as an error without the ref-capture may be another compiler bug. –  void-pointer Jan 28 '12 at 3:15
    
Apparently g++ 4.5 doesn't support constexpr; it merely parses and ignores it. gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=51604 –  void-pointer Jan 28 '12 at 3:19
1  
@void-pointer same warning and behaviour for g++ 4.6.2 –  Seth Carnegie Jan 28 '12 at 3:32

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