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I have multiple threads simultaneously calling push_back() on a shared object of std::vector. Is std::vector thread safe? Or do I need to implement the mechanism myself to make it thread safe?
I want to avoid doing extra "locking and freeing" work because I'm a library user rather than a library designer. I hope to look for existing thread-safe solutions for vector. How about boost::vector, which was newly introduced from boost 1.48.0 onward. Is it thread safe?

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This has to be a dup. But, no, none of the standard containers are thread-safe. –  smparkes Jan 28 '12 at 3:01
    
    
Not quite a dupe, but related: stackoverflow.com/questions/1099513/… –  ergosys Jan 28 '12 at 5:14

4 Answers 4

The C++ standard makes certain threading guarantees for all the classes in the standard C++ library. These guarantees may not be what you'd expect them to be but for all standard C++ library classes certain thread safety guarantees are made. Make sure you read the guarantees made, though, as the threading guarantees of standard C++ containers don't usually align with what you would want them to be. For some classes different, usually stronger, guarantees are made and the answer below specifically applies to the containers. The containers essentially have the following thread-safety guarantees:

  1. there can be multiple concurrent readers of the same container
  2. if there is one writer, there shall be no more writers and no readers

These are typically not what people would want as thread-safety guarantees but are very reasonable given the interface of the standard containers: they are intended to be used efficiently in the absence of multiple accessing threads. Adding any sort of locking for their methods would interfere with this. Beyond this, the interface of the containers isn't really useful for any form of internal locking: generally multiple methods are used and the accesses depend on the outcome of previous accesses. For example, after having checked that a container isn't empty() an element might be accessed. However, with internal locking there is no guarantee that the object is still in the container when it is actually accessed.

To meet the requirements which give the above guarantees you will probably have to use some form of external locking for concurrently accessed containers. I don't know about the boost containers but if they have an interface similar to that of the standard containers I would suspect that they have exactly the same guarantees.

The guarantees and requirements are given in 17.6.4.10 [res.on.objects] paragraph 1:

The behavior of a program is undefined if calls to standard library functions from different threads may introduce a data race. The conditions under which this may occur are specified in 17.6.5.9. [ Note: Modifying an object of a standard library type that is shared between threads risks undefined behavior unless objects of that type are explicitly specified as being sharable without data races or the user supplies a locking mechanism. —endnote]

... and 17.6.5.9 [res.on.data.races]. This section essentially details the more informal description in the not.

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That's called reentrancy :) –  vines Jan 28 '12 at 3:20
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It would reentrancy if it were function only. However, there are objects involved which are guaranteed not to be modified by reading operations. Also, reentrancy refers to the feature of being recursively callable in single threaded programs. –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 28 '12 at 3:29
    
By "reader" and "writer", you are talking about the structure of the container, and not writes to the objects inside, correct? For example, writing to 3 different vector elements, and reading from an fourth from another ten threads, would be allowed all at the same time, as long as none is inserting or removing elements. The iterator validity rules seem relevant here. –  Ben Voigt Oct 9 '14 at 21:19

I have multiple threads simultaneously calling push_back() on a shared object of std::vector. Is std::vector thread safe?

This is unsafe.

Or do I need to implement the mechanism myself to make it thread safe?

Yes.

I want to avoid doing extra "locking and freeing" work because I'm a library user rather than a library designer. I hope to look for existing thread-safe solutions for vector.

Well, vector's interface isn't optimal for concurrent use. It is fine if the client has access to a lock, but for for the interface to abstract locking for each operation -- no. In fact, vector's interface cannot guarantee thread safety without an external lock (assuming you need operations which also mutate).

How about boost::vector, which was newly introduced from boost 1.48.0 onward. Is it thread safe?

Docs state:

//! boost::container::vector is similar to std::vector but it's compatible
//! with shared memory and memory mapped files.
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I have multiple threads simultaneously calling push_back() on a shared object of std::vector. ... I hope to look for existing thread-safe solutions for vector.

Take a look at concurrent_vector in Intel's TBB. Strictly speaking, it's quite different from std::vector internally and is not fully compatible by API, but still might be suitable. You might find some details of its design and functionality in the blogs of TBB developers.

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From An Interview with Alexander Stepanov by Graziano Lo Russo and published by STLport:

Question: It seems that STL has still some drawbacks. First, HP STL is not thread safe. (...)

Answer: SGI STL is thread safe. (...)

This should give a good starting point for further discussion and reading.

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SGI STL is thread safe ONLY for reading access... –  Andy Oct 9 '14 at 15:13
    
@Andy you are correct. I suggested in the answer further discussion/reading that presumably should lead OP to find the sgi.com/tech/stl/thread_safety.html site which explains the issues in details: "The SGI implementation of STL is thread-safe only in the sense that simultaneous accesses to distinct containers are safe, and simultaneous read accesses to to shared containers are safe". IMHO, no point in copying resources that are easily reachable. –  mloskot Oct 9 '14 at 20:29

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