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So, I started to build a small test application to test lambda expressions. I found several examples here and elsewhere but I just don't get them.

Can anybody explain my how to build an expression by using textboxes or any other variables?

My Test List

List<People> lPeople = new List<People> 
{
    new People { Name= "Jean", LastName = "Borrow", Age= 21 } ,
    new People { Name= "Dean", LastName = "Torrow", Age= 20 }
};

Working lambda Expression

IEnumerable<People> result = lPeople.Where(p => p.Age < 21);
dgv_1.DataSource = result.ToList();
dgv_1.Update();

How can I build the expressions dynamically?

Something like lPeople.Where(p => p.LastName == Textbox.Text); (which of course doesn't work)

Thanks!

Edit: Added some code to the solution below

Int32 iAge;
Boolean bSuc = Int32.TryParse(tb_filter_age.Text, out iAge);
if (!bSuc)
{
    iAge = 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
I guess you could have mis-typed the name of the textbox control. Is it TextBox1? :) –  shahkalpesh May 24 '09 at 18:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

"which of course doesn't work"

What happens when you try it? By the look of it, that's the kind of thing I do all the time.

To switch operations based on a ComboBox specifying the operator:

int age = int.Parse(textBoxAge.Text);

IEnumerable<People> result;
if (comboBoxOperator.Text == "=")
    result = lPeople.Where(p => p.Age == age);
else if (comboBoxOperator.Text == "<")
    result = lPeople.Where(p => p.Age < age);
else
    result = lPeople.Where(p => p.Age > age);

dgv_1.DataSource = result.ToList();
dgv_1.Update();

The code that converts the age string into an int will throw if the user enters something that can't be converted. Look up TryParse to avoid exceptions.

share|improve this answer
    
Omg, I'm so sorry! it does work :) but what about the operants? –  Henrik P. Hessel May 24 '09 at 18:07
    
Okay... do you mean that you want to choose the operator (==, <, >, !=, etc.) based on the state of dialog controls? (This would all go much quicker if you explained really carefully what you're trying to achieve!) –  Daniel Earwicker May 24 '09 at 18:32
    
Hi Earwicker, yes, I would like that. I having an UI where the user can choose to filter a list of people by LastName and i.e. by the Age. I have a ListBox where they can select >, = and < and a Textbox where they can input an age. –  Henrik P. Hessel May 24 '09 at 18:55
    
I've updated my answer, but it's nothing fancy. –  Daniel Earwicker May 24 '09 at 19:04
    
To help others users: Int32 iAge; Boolean bSuc = Int32.TryParse(tb_filter_age.Text, out iAge); if (!bSuc) { iAge = 0; } –  Henrik P. Hessel May 24 '09 at 19:54

Try the Predicate Builder at http://www.albahari.com/nutshell/predicatebuilder.aspx

I used it to make an advanced search where the user could keep adding optional search criteria.

share|improve this answer

You can use the Linq Dynamic Query Library to accomplish this. See the following blog post from Scott Guthrie for more information:

http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2008/01/07/dynamic-linq-part-1-using-the-linq-dynamic-query-library.aspx

share|improve this answer

Your example lambda expression will work. How dynamic do you need it to be? If you have a static UI of 'filters' to apply to a collection, you can create code similar to the following:

IEnumerable<People> result = lPeople;
if (txtLastName.Text.Trim().Length != 0) 
    result = result.Where(p => p.LastName == txtLastName.Text); 
if (chkSeniors.Checked) 
    result = result.Where(p => p.Age >= 65);
dgv_1.DataSource = result.ToList();
dgv_1.Update();

If you want the consumer of your data source to apply truly dynamic expressions (afford them the ability to choose other fields to filter and the expressions to use), that's a more complicated feature to implement using a predicate builder tool or LINQ Expression objects.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I want to modify the operators, too. –  Henrik P. Hessel May 24 '09 at 18:15

There should be nothing wrong with the way you're going about it. I have created a simple Windows Forms Application with a TextBox, a Button, and a DataGridView (with names textBox1, button1, and dgv_1 respectively.)

Here is the code I used for the Form1.cs file that worked as expected:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        List<People> lPeople = new List<People> 
        {
            new People { Name= "Jean", LastName = "Borrow", Age= 21 } ,
            new People { Name= "Dean", LastName = "Torrow", Age= 20 }
        };

        IEnumerable<People> result = lPeople.Where(p => p.Name == textBox1.Text);

        dgv_1.DataSource = result.ToList();
        dgv_1.Update();
    }
}    

public class People
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi John, exactly the thing I did :) –  Henrik P. Hessel May 24 '09 at 18:16

In case of dynamic user choice, I think that a more elegant solution rather then using if blocks would be to declare a variable

Func<People, bool> expFilter;

set its value based upon the user choice

switch(comboBoxOperator.Text)
{
   case "=":
   expFilter = p => p.Age == age;
   break;

   case ">":
   expFilter = p => p.Age > age;
   break;

   case "<":
   expFilter = p => p.Age < age;
   break;
}    

and then pass it to the Where clause:

result = lPeople.Where(expFilter);        
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