Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is an example abot how I'm avoiding marker interfaces.

public class AssignableAttribute : Attribute { }

[Assignable]  
public class Foo   
{      
   ...  
}  

[Assignable]  
public class Bar
{      
   ...  
}  

And I'm try to add it to a dictionary Why can't I code a dictionary like this and how to fix it?

Dictionary<string, AssignableAttribute> dictionary = new ...();
dictionary.Add("foo", new Foo());
dictionary.Add("bar", new Bar());

Avoid using marker interfaces (interfaces with no members).

Custom attributes provide a way to mark a type. For more information about custom attributes, see Writing Custom Attributes. Custom attributes are preferred when you can defer checking for the attribute until the code is executing. If your scenario requires compile-time checking, you cannot comply with this guideline.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229022.aspx

share|improve this question
1  
You declare Dictionary of elements of one type and adding elements of another unrelated type and it does not work - expected. Please provide an explanation of what you are trying to achieve since it is not clear from your example. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 28 '12 at 5:44
    
All right, I added more code. –  Darf Jan 28 '12 at 5:51
    
@Darf: This still does not explain which problem you are trying to solve. This just shows which way you are attempting to solve it - and that way does not work. –  ChrisWue Jan 28 '12 at 18:19

5 Answers 5

Custom attributes are preferred when you can defer checking for the attribute until the code is executing. If your scenario requires compile-time checking, you cannot comply with this guideline.

That's the key. When you try to use a generic like that, you're using compile-time checking. You could defer to run-time checking with a Dictionary<string, Object>, but I don't think anyone would prefer that without some special circumstance - it's extra effort and potential for bugs without any real benefit.

Remember, guidelines are only suggestions, and do not have to be followed. This particular guideline even tells you the case where you should not follow it, the very case you are currently in.

share|improve this answer

The type has nothing to do with attributes.

You should use an interface called IFoo, e.g.

 interface IFoo 
 {
     // various methods
 }

 public class Foo : IFoo
 {
 }

 public class Bar : IFoo { }

And the dictionary

 Dictionary<string, IFoo> dictionary = new ...();
 dictionary.Add("foo", new Foo());
 dictionary.Add("bar", new Bar());
share|improve this answer
    
I've updated the post –  Darf Jan 28 '12 at 5:48
    
The trick is using an interface. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/87d83y5b(v=vs.80).aspx for more info. –  Richard Schneider Jan 28 '12 at 5:51
    
This is what I can't understand. I was doing the same way, but .NET guideness practices describes marker interfaces is a bad practice. –  Darf Jan 28 '12 at 5:52
    
Your code is very general and the above is all I can think of. I do not grok "marker intefaces" –  Richard Schneider Jan 28 '12 at 5:55

If you don't want to use an interface you can make a dictionary of objects and just check if the type has the AssignableAttribute specified before adding it to your dictionary

Dictionary<string, object> dictionary = ...;


private void AddAssignable(object assignableObject)
{
     var type = assignableObject.GetType();
     if (type.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(AssignableAttribute), true) == null)
        return;

     dictionary.Add(type.Name, assignableObject);
}
share|improve this answer

Sounds like you are not using the framework available to you to the fullest. The solution to not having marker interfaces is to have an interface that is not a marker.

EDIT I am a bit unclear as to Assignable attribute does, I assume it's some sort of a conversion or deserialization?

How about this: make Assignable attribute into a generic interface IAssignableFrom<T>.

interface IAssignableFrom<T> {
  void AssignFrom(T source);
}

public class Bar : IAssignableFrom<Foo> {
  public void AssignFrom(Foo foo){
     //implementation of assignment here
  }
}

public class Baz : IAssignableFrom<Foo> {
  public void AssignFrom(Foo foo){
     //implementation of assignment here
  }
}

public class Foo : IAssignableFrom<Foo> {
  public void AssignFrom(Foo foo){
     //implementation of assignment here
  }
}

public class Program {
  public static void Main(string[] args){
    IDictionary<string, IAssignableFrom<Foo>> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, IAssignableFrom<Foo>>;

    dictionary.Add("foo", new Foo());
    dictionary.Add("bar", new Bar());
    dictionary.Add("baz", new Baz());
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You cannot express something like "A dictionary of types which have a certain attribute assigned". A type provides you with operations you can invoke on it. By putting an attribute on a type you do not add any operations to it - you basically just provide some additional meta data. If you want to avoid marker interfaces you need to elaborate a bit on what problem exactly you are trying to solve with this.

Edit

Attributes do not change the way a type behaves (they do not add additional operations nor do they change the implementation of the type). They are completely orthogonal to your class hierarchy. They are mainly used so some framework can infer some additional meaning at runtime about a type or it's members (for example the xml serialzier can be told via attribute in which ways to serialize certina members or to ignore certain members). You can't use attributes as compile type restrictions for generics in the sense that you allow all types having a certain attribute attached (the compiler can't check that basically).

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand. The solution here is creating marker interfaces, but .NET Guideness is telling me that custom attributes is a good practice. –  Darf Jan 28 '12 at 5:49
    
@Darf, Solution for what problem? If the problem is "I want to use marker interface somewhere" - just use it. Otherwise you probably have actual problem you trying to solve and noone will be able to help you unless you spell it out. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 28 '12 at 6:18
    
@Darf: I tried to make it a bit more clearer. –  ChrisWue Jan 28 '12 at 18:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.