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How to stop C++ console application from exiting immediately?

I am trying to see my results, what do I do to my code so I can see if what I did is correct?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "C++" << endl;
    cout << "The sum of 11 + 12 = " << 30/2 << endl;
    return 0;
}
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marked as duplicate by FredOverflow, Luc Danton, Flexo, Ben Voigt, Joe Jan 29 '12 at 22:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Are you using Windows? –  summea Jan 28 '12 at 6:26
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Here, to format code properly you indent each line by four spaces, or click on the {} button. –  In silico Jan 28 '12 at 6:26
1  
I know it doesn't work, I was just trying to see if it printed whatever I put and where the calculations were being done. I am using Dev C++ on windows 7. –  rip Daddy 69 Jan 28 '12 at 6:30
1  
I am trying to get Visual C++ to work and it is destroying my life currently. I do not want to mess with another compiler. –  rip Daddy 69 Jan 28 '12 at 6:38
1  
I am using Dev C++ because I can not get Visual Studio to work. –  rip Daddy 69 Jan 28 '12 at 6:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think what you mean is that your DOS terminal closes as soon as your program ends.

A common solution is to have a call to cin, scanf or getch at the end of your program, just before your return 0. This forces the program to wait for some user input before exiting.

A better way is to compile your program and then run it from within a DOS prompt yourself. Just start up a DOS prompt, cd to the directory your program is in and run it from there.

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1  
I can't get cin to work. cin >>"a">> endl; I have been using the highly reccomended visual express and I don't really like it. Dev was much better, it would tell me what the errors were and where, this one does not. –  rip Daddy 69 Feb 1 '12 at 1:13
    
@Jordan: Why would you use cin>>"a"? You use cin to read into a variable not a literal string. Try char a; cin>>a;. Simply changing the direction of the arrows from a cout example is not the way to learn. –  MAK Feb 1 '12 at 9:39

Use getchar() at the end of code or just run your executable file from console.

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1  
I don't know how to run it from the console because I do not know the file extension or how to figure out the file extension. It still instantly closes the window. –  rip Daddy 69 Jan 28 '12 at 6:30
    
@Jordan: On Windows, executables typically have an .exe file extension, although not all valid Windows programs have .exe extensions. However, you do not need to type out the .exe to run an executable in the command line. The name of the application is enough. –  In silico Jan 28 '12 at 6:31
1  
getchar() doesn't work, compiler gives me an error. Do I place it after my cout, after { or after return0;? all are errors. –  rip Daddy 69 Feb 1 '12 at 1:11
    
before return... –  ProblemFactory Feb 1 '12 at 5:36
    
also you must add #include <stdio.h> at the top –  ProblemFactory Feb 1 '12 at 6:07

An other way on windows: system("pause");

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#include <iostream>
using namespace std ;



int main(void)
{


   std::cout<<" \nPress any key to continue\n";
   std::cin.ignore();

   return 0;
}
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1  
I thought you didn't need the std:: if you used namespace std? –  rip Daddy 69 Feb 1 '12 at 1:14

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