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I am running some code in a while loop to ensure a program is always running. If the program isn't running it starts it, if the program isn't there it copies it from a backup and then starts it, nothing fancy:

while (true)
{
    Process backup = new Process();
    ProcessStartInfo check = new ProcessStartInfo(file);
    if (Process.GetProcessesByName(file).Length == 0)
    {
        if(File.Exists(file))
        {
            backup.StartInfo = check;
            backup.Start();
        }
        else if (!File.Exists(file))
        {
            File.Copy(backupFile, file);
            Thread.Sleep(250);
            backup.StartInfo = check;
            backup.Start();
        }
    }
    backup.Close();
    Thread.Sleep(2000);
}

The problem is after each cycle the ram usage goes up by about 100KB which isn't a lot I know but if this is running for an hour or so it's going to cause big problems.

I have tried pausing it and using .Close() on the process but no joy. Any ideas are much appreciated.

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4  
What makes you think there is a memory leak? Have you waited for the GC to collect to see if some data cannot be collected (and thus, real memory leak)? –  ken2k Jan 28 '12 at 11:41
    
Are you actually using the string literal in line 5 or is that a typo? –  Nuffin Jan 28 '12 at 11:42
    
Sorry, typo, fixed. –  Bali C Jan 28 '12 at 11:43
    
You should be wrapping the creation of Process in a using statement. –  Oded Jan 28 '12 at 11:43
    
@ken2k How long would I have to wait for GC to collect? –  Bali C Jan 28 '12 at 11:43
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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted
  1. Put these lines inside the if statement so they are not executed unless the process is not running:

    Process backup = new Process();
    ProcessStartInfo check = new ProcessStartInfo(file);
    
  2. Since Process implements IDisposable, you can wrap it in a using statement, as Oded suggested.

  3. You do not have an actual memory leak. When the garbage collector runs, the memory will be reclaimed. If the temporary memory usage is a problem, you could force the GC to run, but I think once you do #1 you will not have a problem with the temporary memory usage either.

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Like it's said a lot, you don't really have a memory leak (at least it doesn't seem like it).

But what you could do is place your initialization elsewhere, you're often initializing backup and check when you don't need to.

while (true)
{
    Process backup;
    ProcessStartInfo check;
    if (Process.GetProcessesByName(file).Length == 0)
    {
        check = new ProcessStartInfo(file);//moved init
        backup = new Process();//moved init
        if(File.Exists(file))
        {
            backup.StartInfo = check;
            backup.Start();
        }
        else if (!File.Exists(file))
        {
            File.Copy(backupFile, file);
            Thread.Sleep(250);
            backup.StartInfo = check;
            backup.Start();
        }
    }
    backup.Close();
    Thread.Sleep(2000);
}
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You should also move the declarations of the variables closer to their actual usage. –  ken2k Jan 28 '12 at 11:52
    
The problem is backup is referenced outside the if conditional, granted I could move check. –  rtpg Jan 29 '12 at 1:08
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There is no memory leak in the code you have posted.

You could try invoking the garbage collector yourself every X amount of iterations using

System.GC.Collect();

Note that this is generally considered bad design and so you should only use this if you absolutely require controlling the amount of RAM you are using. In any case C# may not be the language of choice if you have such hard resource requirements.

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2  
Strongly disagree. You should NOT ask the GC to collect explicitly in most cases (99% of time actually). –  ken2k Jan 28 '12 at 11:46
    
Yes, and the next loop will make the previous instantiation out of scope and the memory left dangling, it should be GCed anyway –  Jeb Jan 28 '12 at 11:51
    
I agree fully, and there is no "memory leak" in the OPs code (as pointed out above), however, if the OP is so concerned at 100k increments every 2 seconds they can invoke the GC themselves. I was just providing this option for the 1% of cases where it is required, such as low resource environments. –  ose Jan 28 '12 at 12:05
    
I have edited the answer to make this clearer –  ose Jan 28 '12 at 12:07
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I had the same problem, so I used this:

[DllImport("KERNEL32.DLL", EntryPoint = "SetProcessWorkingSetSize", SetLastError = true, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall)]
internal static extern bool SetProcessWorkingSetSize(IntPtr pProcess, int dwMinimumWorkingSetSize, int dwMaximumWorkingSetSize);

[DllImport("KERNEL32.DLL", EntryPoint = "GetCurrentProcess", SetLastError = true, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall)]
internal static extern IntPtr GetCurrentProcess();

Call those methods and the memory will be released.

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Look!, I just checked all those options but nothing. On the other hand I got your problem solved. Create A new thread set its ApartmentState = STA, then put the code that you have inside the while to be executed on the this new thread. Using that you will be sure that the all resources will be release after the thread destruction. I tested it, it works!

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