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There are a lot of Jquery plugins and libraries. and sometimes I want to use more than one in the same web page.

What is the best approach to use them without effecting the speed and performance of the website?

  • Is it best to stick to 1 library or can I mix more than 1 library and more than 1 plugin?
  • Should I gather them in 1 Jquery file? or keep them separated?
  • How can i know I am using too much Jquery? When does it become too much?
  • Is there a tool that I can measure how efficient or fast it is?

For example, I want to add, an image slideshow, tabs, horizontal slider, color and position animation... How can I choose each 1 of these? with a lot of amazing stuff out there!

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4 Answers 4

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Is it best to stick to 1 library or can I mix more than 1 library and more than 1 plugin?

It is fine to mix more than one library and/or plugin. Certain libraries compliment each other such as jQuery and underscore. Try not to use jQuery and Dojo and MooTools all together. That being said, I work for a company whose teams build different components with different frameworks (jQuery and Dojo) that come together on the same website. These components even work together to provide a common user experience. I wouldn't do this myself :)

Should I gather them in 1 Jquery file? or keep them separated?

During development, keep them separated for ease of debugging. When you're ready to deploy, make sure to use minimized versions of the files. Most libraries and plugins offer .min.js files. If not, there are utilities out there that will do it for you. As another step, you can then use a tool to concatenate the minimized files for the best performance.

How can i know I am using too much Jquery? When does it become too much?

The jQuery library, while not a standard, is widely used. The types of plugins you mention are also commonly used. As long as you choose plugins with good reputations, you should be okay. Don't try to to find a plugin for everything you need to do. Javascript is fun language and it is rewarding to build something yourself (tabs, slideshow are easy starters).

Is there a tool that I can measure how efficient or fast it is?

You can use a tool such as YSlow. There are many tools you can find to help you with this.

Finally, do some research on AMD and a library such as require.js as your next step to improve efficiency. It's not right for every situation but it's nice to have in your toolbox.

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I would suggest using Google's CDN for jQuery / jQuery UI - these are used by lots of pages out there and should be cached locally by most clients.

There are lots of tools out there that profile running / downloading of .js files - but for me my preferred is firebug

With regards to multiple vs single - I keep them separate - i prefer to load in what is required on each page - with jQuery core loaded on every page.

I would suggest that you will know when you are using too much jQuery once your page load suffers - so it really depends on each individual project.

^^ just my thoughts and opinions - im sure others will differ

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Well as far as you built your logic efficiently it needs less resources. As far as jQuery I think that first step is avoiding DOM references but saving them to variables which applies on any javascript framework actually.

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"How can I know when I am using too much?" - from a UX perspective, you are using too much when the focus is on the gizmos, not the page content. I have not found a point that the page load time becomes an issues before the page usability does, so I would suggest focussing on the actual usability of the page as a primary concern.

For efficiency, only load on a page what you need on the page, unless you are using a particular tool across most pages ( like core jquery ) in which case make it loadable for every page. Then look into the performance of these features that are loaded for every page especially, and see whether the performance hit is worth the feature. And follow all of the usual advice to improve the performance load of these.

Firebug is what I like for checking the load performance, to give you an idea of whether your extra code is starting to actually impact the times.

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