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It's possible to do this if the class B NOT extended the class A but the class A call a new class B


    class A{
        public $lang;
        public function __construct($lang) {
             $this->lang=$lang;
        }
        public function new_B(){
            return new B();
        }
    }
    class B{

        public function __construct() {
            echo 'lang='.A::$lang;
        }

    }

    $root=new A('eng');
    $root->new_B();

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closed as unclear what you're asking by xbonez, Kay, andrewsi, Ashwini Agarwal, Riser Apr 15 '14 at 5:51

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3  
What's the question? –  Phil Jan 28 '12 at 12:58
    
You need to decide if you want $lang to be a static class property, or an object attribute for $A objects. –  mario Jan 28 '12 at 12:59
    
and how i can do this with static method? –  Cristian Rubini Jan 28 '12 at 13:34

3 Answers 3

You seem to have a mixup of concepts here. The $lang property of A is an instance level variable (since it is not defined as static), therefore you cannot access it statically as you are trying to. If you were to declare the variable as static then you would have access to it, but if you have multiple instances of class A that change it, it will change on the class level, rather than instance level.

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I have try this but it doesn't work <pre> class A{ static $lang; public function __construct($lang) { $this->lang=$lang; } public function new_B(){ return new B(); } public function get_Lang(){ return $this->lang } } class B{ public function __construct() { echo 'lang='.A::get_Lang(); } } $root=new A('eng'); $root->new_B(); </pre> –  Cristian Rubini Jan 28 '12 at 13:28
    
There's no reason it would, you completely changed the structure of your code. –  Cags Jan 28 '12 at 14:04

Is A::$lang common to all A objects you will create? Then make this variable static. If not you can pass A::$lang as parameter to the B constructor. That is

class A{
    public $lang;
    public function __construct($lang) {
        $this->lang=$lang;
    }
    public function new_B(){
        return new B($this->lang);
    }
}
class B{

    public function __construct($lang) {
        echo 'lang='.$lang;
    }

}

Following is making A::$lang static:

class A{
    public static $lang;
    public function __construct($lang) {
        self::$lang=$lang;
    }
    public function new_B(){
        return new B();
    }
}
class B{

    public function __construct() {
        echo 'lang='.A::$lang;
    }

}
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Yes A is common to all. but how I can set this to static and call that from B? –  Cristian Rubini Jan 28 '12 at 13:50
    
Just edited adding the static case –  Al_ Jan 28 '12 at 17:39

change the class B like this:

class B extends A{

    public function __construct() {
        echo 'lang='.$this->$lang;  // you can use parent variables like this
    }

}
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