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I am using the substr() function, however it's not working. My code is below

std::string s1 = ".V/123\n"
          ".V/233\n";

std::string ss;
if(s1.substr(0,3) == ".V/")
{
    ss = s1.substr(3);

    std::cout << ss;
}  else {
    std::cout << "INCORRECT" << std::endl;
}

The output is 123.V/123

Shouldn't it be:

123
123

Could someone tell me where I am going wrong please?

share|improve this question
4  
What in your code could remove the second .V/? (And that's not the output I get, there's a new line.) – Mat Jan 28 '12 at 15:16
    
Also the string on the second line is 233, not 123. Is that a mistake, or was that on purpose? – nycynik Jan 28 '12 at 16:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your string contains 2 lines. Doing ".V/123\n" ".V/223\n" will do the same as ".V/123\n.V/223\n". Either split that up into separate variables or an array. What your substr(3) is doing is extracting all the characters in the string from the 4th character to the end, so 'ss' is getting set to "123\n.V/223\n". This is what you're seeing.

What you want is something like this

  std::string s1[2] = { ".V/123\n", ".V/233\n"};

  std::string ss;
  for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
    if (s1[i].substr(0,3) == ".V/") {
      ss = s1[i].substr(3);

      std::cout << ss;
    }  else {
      std::cout << "INCORRECT" << std::endl;
    }
  }
share|improve this answer

The output from your code should be:

123
.V/233
<empty line>

and this is exactly what it prints on my machine. First of all notice the second 3 digits are 233(I guess that is a typo), not 123. All substr(3) does is: it removes the first 3 characters from your string. No reason that .V/ should be removed.

share|improve this answer

The first strange thing I see is the init of s1

std::string s1 = ".V/123\n"
      ".V/233\n";

if you just want it to be ".V/123\n", you should declare it as:

std::string s1 = ".V/123\n";

The second strange thing is the second call to substr, only defines the position, so you will get from the position to the end of the string, so that works as advertised. I added a reference for you below.

reference: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/substr/

share|improve this answer
1  
How is having a string divided in two lines strange?!! – Shahbaz Jan 28 '12 at 15:25
    
@nycynik - The preprocessor will concatenate adjacent string literals, even if they are on different lines. – Bo Persson Jan 28 '12 at 15:39
    
With a string this short, I do not see any reason to do it, and thought it might have been a mistake. – nycynik Jan 28 '12 at 15:56
ss = s1.substr(3).substr(0,3);

this should work

share|improve this answer
    
No - this would print only one 123 while he expects two separate lines with 123 on them(I don't know why) – Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 28 '12 at 15:24

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