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I am trying to read a specific part of a website (www.joindota.com) that has the same values all over. I'll explain what I want to do with examples from the site:

The following HTML is a portion of what I want to read from the site:

<div id="matchticker_coverage_content_1761" style="display:none;">
    <a href="http://www.joindota.com/en/matches/16102-team-dignitas-dota-vs-sk-gaming-dota" class="item">
        <div class="sub" style="width: 18px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/themes/joindota/ticker_9.png" border="0" alt="" /></div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/ro.gif" border="0" alt="ro" title="Romania" /> Digni</div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 20px;">vs.</div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/dk.gif" border="0" alt="dk" title="Denmark" /> SK</div>
        <div class="sub" style="float: right; text-align: right;">
            <span title="Sun, 29.01.2012, 16:00 CET">tomorrow</span>
        </div>
        <div class="cl"></div>
    </a>
    <a href="http://www.joindota.com/en/matches/16101-world-elite-vs-mineski" class="item">
        <div class="sub" style="width: 18px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/themes/joindota/ticker_9.png" border="0" alt="" /></div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/cn.gif" border="0" alt="cn" title="China" /> WE</div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 20px;">vs.</div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/ph.gif" border="0" alt="ph" title="Philippines" /> Mski</div>
        <div class="sub" style="float: right; text-align: right;">
            <span title="Sun, 29.01.2012, 14:00 CET">tomorrow</span>
        </div>
        <div class="cl"></div>
    </a>
    ....
</div>

I want to read everything from <div id="matchticker_coverage_content_1761" >

I just need to read all the values within the <div> tags that I supplied there. For example, it would output:

  • Digni vs. SK
  • WS vs. Mski
  • EG vs. Fnatic
  • etc.

All the div values are the same within that HTML, I just need to know how to "select" <div id="matchticker_coverage_content_1761" > specifically in the page, and read all the other divs within that div, which is just the ones:

<div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/ro.gif" border="0" alt="ro" title="Romania" /> Digni</div>
div class="sub" style="width: 20px;">vs.</div>
                        <div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/dk.gif" border="0" alt="dk" title="Denmark" /> SK</div>

All the the <div> values are the same, all I am interested in is the text within them like the Digni and the vs. and the SK, for example.

I just need to read all of those values within the <div id="matchticker_coverage_content_1761" > </div>

The reason is because the site has many of these, but I only need to read a specific part. Here is another part on the same page that is identical, only the the div where all the other divs are in is different.

Example:

<div id="matchticker_coverage_content_1596" style="display:none;">
    <a href="http://www.joindota.com/en/matches/16564-westernwolves-vs-panzer" class="item">
        <div class="sub" style="width: 18px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/themes/joindota/ticker_9.png" border="0" alt="" /></div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/fr.gif" border="0" alt="fr" title="France" /> Wolves</div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 20px;">vs.</div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/de.gif" border="0" alt="de" title="Germany" /> PANZER</div>
        <div class="sub" style="float: right; text-align: right;">
            <span title="Tue, 31.01.2012, 21:00 CET">31.01.</span>
        </div>
        <div class="cl"></div>
    </a>
    <a href="http://www.joindota.com/en/matches/16626-panzer-vs-just-4-the-tournament" class="item">
        <div class="sub" style="width: 18px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/themes/joindota/ticker_9.png" border="0" alt="" /></div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/de.gif" border="0" alt="de" title="Germany" /> PANZER</div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 20px;">vs.</div>
        <div class="sub" style="width: 103px;"><img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/de.gif" border="0" alt="de" title="Germany" /> J4T</div>
        <div class="sub" style="float: right; text-align: right;">
            <span title="Sun, 29.01.2012, 19:00 CET">tomorrow</span>
        </div>
        <div class="cl"></div>
    </a>
    ....
</div>

Notice how all the <div> are exactly the same within the beginning <div>? that <div> where all the <div> are in is <div id="matchticker_coverage_content_1596" style="display:none;"> which is different to the other part of the page where it's <div id="matchticker_coverage_content_1761" style="display:none;">

My ultimate question is, how do I select that beginning <div> that holds the other <div>, and read those specific ones I mentioned earlier?

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1 Answer 1

Web-crawling/spidering, whether it's of semantic HTML or not, for specific data points (as a opposed to a general relevance search like Google), is more art than science.

You more often than not have to tailor your crawler specifically for each site that you want to crawl in order to get the data for as you want to get the same data points from each site, but each site represents them differently.

With that in mind, it's usually an exercise in spotting the patterns that will allow you to identify the data points consistently within a certain site.

I've taken the liberty of chopping down your HTML samples, as well as formatting it to show the hierarchy of tags; this wouldn't affect how the page is parsed or displayed, as it's about what's in the tags, not outside of them.

With that rearrangement, the patterns should appear.

Let's take identifying the container <div> elements first. The thing that uniquely identifies these <div> elements is the id attribute, they all are of the form:

<div id="matchticker_coverage_content_**some number**" style="display:none;">

(Note: you could look for any <div> element with a style="display:none;" attribute, but that's very brittle, and is not uniquely identifying the container, that attribute could be applied anywhere else and has no semantic meaning)

Unfortunately, the id attribute is a problem, because it seems that the end of it is a number that is an id of some sort, and not consistent throughout the pages. If you knew the id of the container, you could just use the following expression with Html Agility Pack:

\\div[id='matchticker_coverage_content_1596']

But I imagine that you don't know it.

What you really want is the ability to look for all <div> elements where the id attribute starts with matchticker_coverage_content_.

Html Agility Pack doesn't support this kind of selector syntax. However, jQuery does with the following syntax:

div[id^='matchticker_coverage_content_']

What's even better is that the fizzler project does support this selector. So in that case, I'd use fizzler to get that container.

Once you have the container, it's a matter of looking through it's child elements. Again, after the edit, it should be obvious that each matchup you are looking for (with the relevant <div> elements) are contained inside an anchor (i.e. <a>) element. So once you have the container <div>, you can simply select out all child elements of that are anchor elements with the following syntax:

/a

(or just a selector of a on the container node if using fizzler)

Once you have that, you don't really need to detect the vs., you can assume it's there, you really want to detect the players.

These are harder, because there's nothing semantic about the tags, the classes, or the ids. However, there is a discriminator. Looking at the player tags (I've chopped some of this down to make it more clear):

<div class="sub">
    <img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/themes/joindota/ticker_9.png" 
        border="0" alt="" /></div>

<div class="sub">
    <img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/ro.gif" 
        border="0" alt="ro" title="Romania" /> Digni</div>

<div class="sub" style="width: 20px;">vs.</div>

<div class="sub" style="width: 103px;">
    <img src="http://www.gs-media.de/img/flags/dk.gif" 
        border="0" alt="dk" title="Denmark" /> SK</div>

You can see that the players are in <div> tags which have a child <img> tag where the alt attribute is not empty (this is important, as you don't want to process the first <div> element).

Once you identify those <img> tags, you can simply get the parent node (the <div>) and take the text from the node to get your player. The first one is the first player side, the second one you process is the second player side.

An alternate approach would be to identify the <div> element that contains the "vs." text in it, and then look at the siblings, the one prior is the first player, while the one after is the second player.

Note, the last step is very brittle, and it will always be brittle because there's no semantic indicators in the tags. You're essentially depending on an implementation detail (because you have no other choice).

I strongly recommend that you have test cases around certain pages where you parse the content and verify the data; this way, if the structure of the page changes, you will know immediately and can change your scraping logic accordingly.

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Note: I'm currently doing the exact same thing, except for a different genre of video games (fighting games, like the Street Fighter series, the Marvel vs. Capcom series, etc.) . –  casperOne Jan 28 '12 at 21:05
    
Thank you for the great reply and explanation. I just can't seem to apply your explanation in practice correctly. If it is not much trouble, could you provide an example please? –  user1104783 Jan 29 '12 at 12:30
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