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As the title suggests, I've been having problems loading .tga files. I've been using this for reference and as far as I can tell (Apart from using c++ functions instead of c ones) I'm doing the same thing. I do get a texture but it's a garbled version of what it should be and I'm not really sure why. Please excuse all the mistakes, I'm just trying to get it working.

Header:

struct TGA
{
    GLuint Load(const char* filename);
    unsigned char header_[12];
    unsigned char bpp_;
    unsigned char id_;
    unsigned short width_;
    unsigned short height_;
    unsigned char* data_;
};

Cpp:

GLuint TGA::Load(const char* filename)
{
width_ = 0; height_ = 0;
bpp_ = 32; id_ = 8;
data_ = 0;

std::ifstream file;

file.open(filename, std::ios::binary | std::ios::ate);

if(file.fail())
{
    std::cout<<filename<<" could not be opened."<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

file.seekg(0, std::ios::beg);
file.read((char*)header_, sizeof(unsigned char)*12);
file.read((char*)&width_, sizeof(unsigned short));
file.read((char*)&height_, sizeof(unsigned short));
file.read((char*)&bpp_, sizeof(unsigned char));
file.read((char*)&id_, sizeof(unsigned char));

int imageSize = width_ * height_;
std::cout<<imageSize<<std::endl;

data_ = new unsigned char[imageSize * 3];  //3 means RGB 
file.read((char*)data_, imageSize * 3);

file.close();

GLuint texture;
glPixelStorei(GL_UNPACK_ALIGNMENT, 1);
glGenTextures(1, &texture);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, texture);

glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGBA, width_, height_, 0, GL_BGRA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, data_);

glTexEnvf(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_TEXTURE_ENV_MODE, GL_MODULATE );

glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);
glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);

glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_CLAMP);
glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_CLAMP);

gluBuild2DMipmaps(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 3, width_, height_, GL_RGBA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, data_);


delete [] data_;

return texture;
}
share|improve this question
    
Not an answer.. but.. ensure padding and read all at once! And don't forget endianess, if you ever want it to be portable.. –  user405725 Jan 28 '12 at 17:06
    
What is bpp_ after reading the file header? (Vlad: I believe TGA doesn't pad like BMP.) –  user7116 Jan 28 '12 at 17:07
    
bpp is supposed to be bits per pixel or pixel depth. It's 24 for RGB images. I tried checking the adding/alignment of the various bits but they seem to be fine. I'm unsure of how to parse the data after reading it as one big chunk. –  Sullivan Jan 28 '12 at 17:11
    
@Sullivan: my question was what is the value of bpp_ after you read it from the file. –  user7116 Jan 28 '12 at 17:13
    
It has the ascii value of 24 which seems to be an instruction in ascii. –  Sullivan Jan 28 '12 at 17:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you read in the data, you assume the targa file has 24 bits per pixel (file.read((char*)data_, imageSize * 3)) without checking the value of bpp_. You then pass the image data to OpenGL, and say your data is in 32-bpp BGRA format.

You should check what the value of bpp_ is, allocate and read the data based on that value and also pass the correct data format to OpenGL (BGR or BGRA, depending on whether the alpha channel is included in the image or not).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! I can't belive I was trying to use an RGB image when opengl was expecting an RGBA image. Thank you to everyone for their help and advice. –  Sullivan Jan 28 '12 at 17:21

Yes, you're doing the same thing :)

If you look at the comments below the code you used for a reference, the code it reads data assuming that the computer running it is big endian (like the PS3). I'm guessing here, but are you running on a PC (which uses little endian)?

Getting endian-ness wrong would make all your datatypes larger than a byte get the wrong values (height_/width_), you'll need to check if the computer that runs the program uses big- or little-endian and correct the values accordingly.

To convert height_ and width_ to correct endian-ness you should simply be able to use; ntohs and ntohl (network byte order being big endian)

height_ = ntohs(height_);
width_  = ntohs(width_);
share|improve this answer
    
I did read about the endian issue the article had. I am running this code on a PC (Ubuntu Linux 64 bit) but I have no idea which endian type it is... –  Sullivan Jan 28 '12 at 17:14
    
An x86 PC is little endian, no matter the operating system. –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 28 '12 at 17:17
    
I had a vague memory of that but I wasn't sure. –  Sullivan Jan 28 '12 at 17:22
    
@Sullivan Added a way to convert to the correct endian-ness to my answer. –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 28 '12 at 17:22
    
Thank you. Unfortunately, I can only vote you up once ;) –  Sullivan Jan 28 '12 at 17:27

First let me note that you're doing things way better than the worst method out there (reading into a packed struct that is). For a robust file parser always read the file piece by piece. That's the only way to avoid bugs and exploits.

Unfortunately there are still a few problems, but those are easy to fix:

struct TGA
{
    GLuint Load(const char* filename);
    unsigned char header_[12];
    unsigned char bpp_;
    unsigned char id_;

    unsigned short width_;
    unsigned short height_;

width and height being short may become a problem. The devil is in the detail, but I'll explain in time. For now we should respect that on some architectures short may be in fact too short for us. To be on the safe side use uint16_t from stdint.h (part of C99 standard) or better yet uint32_t. We'll see why.

    unsigned char* data_;
};

GLuint TGA::Load(const char* filename)
{
width_ = 0; height_ = 0;
bpp_ = 32; id_ = 8;
data_ = 0;

We're going to overwrite those anyway, so no need to clear them, but no harm either.

std::ifstream file;

file.open(filename, std::ios::binary | std::ios::ate);

if(file.fail())
{
    std::cout<<filename<<" could not be opened."<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

file.seekg(0, std::ios::beg);
file.read((char*)header_, sizeof(unsigned char)*12);

file.read((char*)&width_, sizeof(unsigned short));
file.read((char*)&height_, sizeof(unsigned short));

Okay, those are a bit problematic, because they assume the program to run on a little-endian machine. Say you were to develop for a PowerPC (think PlayStation 3, XBox or a ARM running in big endian mode) this code would break. Solution:

char buf[2]; file.read(buf, 2); width = buf[0] | buf[1]<<8; and the same for height. This code has still issues if running on a machine with a char size other than 8, but those are between far and few these days. If you want to be on the safe side, add a #if CHAR_BITS!=8 #error "char bits not 8" #endif somewhere.

file.read((char*)&bpp_, sizeof(unsigned char));
file.read((char*)&id_, sizeof(unsigned char));

Now the following line is wrong:

int imageSize = width_ * height_; // <<<<<<<<<

Since width_ and height_ are both of type short the multiplication will coerece to width short. This particular behaviour of C and C++ is one of the biggest source of nasty, exploitable bugs. Say I'd give you a picture in which header were declared width = height 2^15-1, a number fitting well into the expected 16 bits. If you multiply those two and coerce it into short you get… 1. And then there's a little other problem as well.

std::cout<<imageSize<<std::endl;

data_ = new unsigned char[imageSize * 3];  //3 means RGB 
file.read((char*)data_, imageSize * 3);

The good thing is, that you read only the amount of bytes you allocated via a proxy variable, so I can't inject code into your program. However I can crash it, because later on your glTexImage2D call will try to read (2^15 -1)^2 bytes from unallocated storage and thus cause a segfault. The trick to avoid this is to cast individual variables to a type large enough in the computation. Or you do as I suggested and use uint32_t for width and height as well. I code by the rule that every variable should hold at least twice the bits as required for the largest allowed value in it. Unfortunately the C standard can not be "fixed" to coerce to the size of the L type of a statement, because that would break a lot of existing code.

The other problem you have is, that you hardcoded 3 channels. Why? You've got the bpp-header, which tells you the format. So let's change this: uint32_t imageSize = (uint_32)width_ * height_ * bpp_/8;. Note that it's neccesary to cast only one variable of the expression to the larger type. However don't make this mistake: (uint32_t)(width_ * height_ * bpp_/8) which would cast the short typed result to uint32_t - mind the parentheses.

Last but not least we can pass this to glTexImage2D, or to gluBuildMipMap2D. I strongly suggest not using gluBuildMipmap because it will convert your texture to power-of-2 dimensions, which is no longer needed since OpenGL-2. Instead call glGenerateMipmap The format parameter should not be the number of channels, but a token of GL_RED, GL_RG, GL_RGB, GL_RGBA. So use a small switch statement for this:

GLenum internal_format;
GLenum format;
GLenum buffer_format;
switch(bpp_) {
case 8:
    internal_format = GL_R8;
    format = GL_RED;
    buffer_format = GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE;
    break;
case 16:
    internal_format = GL_RGB5;
    format = GL_RGB;
    buffer_format = GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT_5_6_5;
    break;
case 24:
    internal_format = GL_RGB8;
    format = RGB;
    buffer_format = GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE;
    break;
case 32:
    internal_format = GL_RGBA8;
    format = RGB;
    buffer_format = GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE;
    break;
default:
    format_unsupported_error(); return;
}

glTexImage2D(..., internal_format, ..., internal_format, format, ...);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestions. I’m not exactly inexperienced, but I still have a lot to learn. The concept of using variables of double the data size sounds interesting but isn’t that a gratuitous use of memory? The magic numbers were there while I was testing and I’ve since updated. –  Sullivan Jan 29 '12 at 21:21
    
As for using opengl 2, I’m using a lot of old tutorials for reference (think NeHe and the like) as finding examples using newer versions of opengl are few and far between. I’m trying to be consistent as possible (apart from avoiding immediate mode drawing if I can help it) and I’ll take the plunge to learn “better” opengl once I understand its basic working better. –  Sullivan Jan 29 '12 at 21:22
    
@Sullivan: Either be carefull to cast your variables to the right size for the operation, or use twice the size. Frankly, if we're talking about structure headers and not bulk data the added safety largely compensates the added memory costs. Variables like width, height and the like account for only a small amount of memory consumed, but for many of the exploitable bugs out there. Bulk data you'll keep in a array of matching element size anyway. –  datenwolf Jan 29 '12 at 21:46

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