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Javascript is everywhere and to my mind is constantly gaining importance. Most programmers would agree that while Javascript itself is ugly, its "territory" sure is impressive. With the capabilities of HTML5 and the speed of modern browsers deploying an application via Javascript is an interesting option: It's probably as cross-platform as you can get.

The natural result are cross compilers. The predominant is probably GWT but there are several other options out there. My favourite is Coffeescript since it adds only a thin layer over Javascript and is much more "lightweight" than for example GWT.

There's just one thing that has been bugging me: Although my project is rather small performance has always been an important topic. Here's a quote

The GWT SDK provides a set of core Java APIs and Widgets. These allow you to write AJAX applications in Java and then compile the source to highly optimized JavaScript

Is Coffeescript optimized, too? Since Coffeescript seems to make heavy use of non-common Javascript functionality I'm worried how their performance compares.

Have you experience with Coffeescript related speed issues ? Do you know a good benchmark comparison ?

share|improve this question
3  
What non-common functionality does CoffeeScript use? – Dave Newton Jan 28 '12 at 17:28
12  
"JavaScript itself is ugly" -> false. – Raynos Jan 28 '12 at 18:19
3  
I agree with Raynos: bad code is bad code, and can be written in any language. – calvinf Jan 29 '12 at 2:33
up vote 32 down vote accepted

Apologies for resurrecting an old topic but it was concerning me too. I decided to perform a little test and one of the simplest performance tests I know is to write consecutive values to an array, memory is consumed in a familiar manner as the array grows and 'for' loops are common enough in real life to be considered relevant.

After a couple of red herrings I find coffeescript's simplest method is:

newway = -> [0..1000000]
# simpler and quicker than the example from http://coffeescript.org/#loops
# countdown = (num for num in [10..1])

This uses a closure and returns the array as the result. My equivalent is this:

function oldway()
{
    var a = [];
    for (var i = 0; i <= 1000000; i++)
        a[i] = i;
    return a;
}

As you can see the result is the same and it grows an array in a similar way too. Next I profiled in chrome 100 times each and averaged.

newway() | 78.5ms
oldway() | 49.9ms

Coffeescript is 78% slower. I refute that "the CoffeeScript you write ends up running as fast as (and often faster than) the JS you would have written" (Jeremy Ashkenas)


Addendum: I was also suspicious of the popular belief that "there is always a one to one equivalent in JS". I tried to recreate my own code with this:

badway = ->
    a = []
    for i in [1..1000000]
        a[i] = i
    return a

Despite the similarity it still proved 7% slower because it adds extra checks for direction (increment or decrement) which means it is not a straight translation.

share|improve this answer
5  
why apologise for an interesting answer. I wouldn't have expected differences that great. Sure one could argue that adding all numbers from 0 to 1000000 to an array is not a normal use case and that you just looked at one browser. But 78% !? That's tough +1 – lhk Oct 13 '12 at 14:28
    
this should be the answer since the author takes time to measure and point out the problem in generated js from coffee. The only reason to use coffee is all about productive. – nXqd Aug 13 '13 at 11:13
    
Closures are often reported as a performance drain in Javascript. Coffeescript uses them extensively, even where they would not be absolutely necessary. – relet Oct 31 '13 at 11:37
    
+1 and the way it handles classes and inheritence behind the scenes is pretty horrible same with "undefined" and undefined, the second undefined is converted to void 0 and compared with null. If anyone has read a JS book they no both of those are bad – Josh Bedo Mar 4 '14 at 3:44

This is all quite intersting and there is one truth, coffee script cannot work faster than fully optimized javascript.

That said, since coffee script is generating javascript. There are ways to make it worth it. Sadly, it doesn't seem to be the case yet.

Lets take the example:

new_way = -> [0..1000000]
new_way()

It compiles to this with coffee script 1.6.2

// Generated by CoffeeScript 1.6.2
(function() {
  var new_way;

  new_way = function() {
    var _i, _results;

    return (function() {
      _results = [];
      for (_i = 0; _i <= 1000000; _i++){ _results.push(_i); }
      return _results;
    }).apply(this);
  };

  new_way();

}).call(this);

And the code provided by clockworkgeek is

function oldway()
{
    var a = [];
    for (var i = 0; i <= 1000000; i++)
        a[i] = i;
    return a;
}
oldway()

But since the coffee script hides the function inside a scope, we should do that for javascript too. We don't want to polute window right?

(function() {
    function oldway()
    {
        var a = [];
        for (var i = 0; i <= 1000000; i++)
            a[i] = i;
        return a;
    }
    oldway()
}).call(this);

So here we have code that does the same thing actually. And then we'd like to actually test both versions a couple of time.

Coffee script

for i in [0..100]
    new_way = -> [0..1000000]
    new_way()

Generated JS, and you may ask yourself what is going on there??? It's creating i and _i for whatever reason. It's clear to me from these two, only one is needed.

// Generated by CoffeeScript 1.6.2
(function() {
  var i, new_way, _i;

  for (i = _i = 0; _i <= 100; i = ++_i) {
    new_way = function() {
      var _j, _results;

      return (function() {
        _results = [];
        for (_j = 0; _j <= 1000000; _j++){ _results.push(_j); }
        return _results;
      }).apply(this);
    };
    new_way();
  }

}).call(this);

So now we're going to update our Javascript.

(function() {
    function oldway()
    {
        var a = [];
        for (var i = 0; i <= 1000000; i++)
            a[i] = i;
        return a;
    }

    var _i;

    for(_i=0; _i <= 100; ++_i) {
        oldway()
    }
}).call(this);

So the results:

time coffee test.coffee

real    0m5.647s
user    0m0.016s
sys     0m0.076s

time node test.js

real    0m5.479s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s

The js takes

time node test2.js

real    0m5.904s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s

So you might ask yourself... what the hell coffee script is faster??? and then you look at the code and ask yourself... so let's try to fix that!

(function() {
    function oldway()
    {
        var a = [];
        for (var i = 0; i <= 1000000; i++)
            a.push(i);
        return a;
    }

    var _i;

    for(_i=0; _i <= 100; ++_i) {
        oldway()
    }
}).call(this);

We'll then do a small fix to the JS script and change a[i] = i to a.push(i) And then lets try again...and then BOOM

time node test2.js

real    0m5.330s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s

This small change made it faster than our CoffeeScript Now lets look at the generated CoffeeScript... and remove those double variables...

to this:

// Generated by CoffeeScript 1.6.2
(function() {
  var i, new_way;

  for (i = 0; i <= 100; ++i) {
    new_way = function() {
      var _j, _results;

      return (function() {
        _results = [];
        for (_j = 0; _j <= 1000000; _j++){ _results.push(_j); }
        return _results;
      }).apply(this);
    };
    new_way();
  }

}).call(this);

and BOOM

time node test.js

real    0m5.373s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s

Well what I'm trying to say is that there are great benefits to use a higher language. The generated CoffeeScript wasn't optimized. But wasn't that far from the pure js code. The code optimization that clockworkgeek tried to use with using index directly instead of push actually seemed to backfire and worked slowlier than the generated coffeescript.

The truth it that such kind of optimization could be hard to find and fix. On the other side, from version to version, coffeescript could generate optimized js code for current browser or interpreters. The CoffeeScript would remain unchanged but could be generated again to speedup things.

If you write directly in javascript, there is now way to really optimize the code as much as one would with a real compiler.

The other interesting part is that one day, CoffeeScript or other generators to javascript could be used to analyse code (like jslint) and remove parts of the code where some variables aren't needed... Compile functions differently with different arguments to speed up things when some variables aren't needed. If you have purejs, you'll have to expect that there is a JIT compiler that will do the job right and its good for coffeescript too.

For example, I could optimize the coffee script one last time..by removing the new_way = (function... from inside the for loop. One smart programmer would know that the only thing that happen here is reaffection the function on each loop which doesn't change the variable. The function is created in the function scope and isn't recreated on each loop. That said it shouldn't change much...

time node test.js

real    0m5.363s
user    0m0.015s
sys     0m0.000s

So this is pretty much it.

share|improve this answer
    
What change did you make to the CoffeeScript code that generated the last block? – pilau Sep 3 '14 at 19:57
    
I removed the _i. I didn't change the coffescript code. I edited the generated code. – Loïc Faure-Lacroix Sep 3 '14 at 20:28
    
Alright. At first, I thought you were presenting a practical solution for making CoffeeScript output better code. I see now that you changed that, only to make your point that the CoffeeScript transpiler is a layer that can technically always be improved to yield more and more optimized code. – pilau Sep 4 '14 at 3:37
    
Yes that's the point, except that if the JIT was smart enough, it shouldn't make a difference. Which means that there is a place for improvement there and there. – Loïc Faure-Lacroix Sep 4 '14 at 3:58
    
That is true. Your answer should be the one accepted, as it presents a much stronger conclusion as well as the way to get there. Well done. – pilau Sep 4 '14 at 7:08

Short answer: No.

CoffeeScript generates javascript, so its maximum possible speed equals to the speed of javascript. But while you can optimize js code at low-level (yeah, it sounds ironical) and gain some performance boost - with CoffeeScript you cannot do that.

But speed of code should not be your concern, when choosing CS over JS, as the difference is negligible for most tasks.

share|improve this answer

Coffescript compiles directly to JavaScript, meaning that there is always a one to one equivalent in JS for any Coffeescript source. There is nothing non-common about it. A performance gain can come from optimized things e.g. the fact that Coffescript stores the Array length in a separate variable in a for loop instead of requesting it in every iteration. But that should be a common practise in JavaScript, too, it is just not enforced by the language itself.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice answer. I guess there might be a perf gain if the JS CoffeeScript generates is smarter than what the developer otherwise would have...which I'm guessing is not uncommon – Adam Rackis Jan 28 '12 at 17:40
    
Creating a new language that incorporates best practises is imho a good idea. The problem I see is when it tries to get too fancy. And it makes sense for everybody to know why CoffeeScript generates the JS it does. – Daff Jan 28 '12 at 17:55
4  
@Raynos the difference between CoffeeScript and Javascript is that if you wrote in Coffeescript, a new version of CoffeeScript could actually optimize how it generate javascript. If you wrote directly in javascript. Then you're screwed anyway. Without rewriting code, you can hand up with faster code. – Loïc Faure-Lacroix May 24 '13 at 15:17
2  
That holds true for JavaScript, too. Googles V8 was a huge performance improvement over many other JavaScript engines and will keep getting better. But you didn't have to rewrite your JavaScript to work with Google Chrome. – Daff May 24 '13 at 15:32
1  
@Daff that's not exactly true, unless the JIT engine get much better optimizing things it wasn't able to optimize before. CoffeeScript could rebuild differently to create code that will get efficiently optimized by the JIT engine. The difference is that coffeescript only has to get rebuilt. The JS has to be rewritten by hand to make it easier for the JIT to optimize it. – Loïc Faure-Lacroix Aug 19 '13 at 5:47

I want to add something to the answer of Loïc Faure-Lacroix...

It seems, that you only printed the times of one Browser. And btw "x.push(i)" is not faster that "x[i] = i" according to jsperf : https://jsperf.com/array-direct-assignment-vs-push/130

Chrome:  push => 79,491  ops/s; direct assignment => 3,815,588 ops/s;
IE Edge: push => 358,036 ops/s; direct assignment => 7,047,523 ops/s;
Firefox: push => 67,123  ops/s; direct assignment => 206,444   ops/s;

Another point -> x.call(this) and x.apply(this)... I don't see any performance reason to that. Even jsperf confirms by that: http://jsperf.com/call-apply-segu/18

Chrome: 
direct call => 47,579,486 ops/s; x.call => 45,239,029 ops/s; x.apply => 15,036,387 ops/s;
IE Edge: 
direct call => 113,210,261 ops/s; x.call => 17,771,762 ops/s; x.apply => 6,550,769 ops/s;
Firefox:
direct call => 780,255,612 ops/s; x.call => 76,210,019 ops/s; x.apply => 2,559,295 ops/s;

First to mention - I used the actual Browsers.

Secondly - I extended the test by a for-loop, because with one call the test is to short...

Last but not least - now the tests for all browsers are like the following:


Here I used CoffeeScript 1.10.0 (compiled with the same code given in his answer)

console.time('coffee');// added manually
(function() {
  var new_way;

  new_way = function() {
    var i, results;
    return (function() {
      results = [];
      for (i = 0; i <= 1000000; i++){ results.push(i); }
      return results;
    }).apply(this);
  };

  // manually added on both
  var i;
  for(i = 0; i != 10; i++)
  {
    new_way();
  }

}).call(this);
console.timeEnd('coffee');// added manually

Now the Javascript

console.time('js');
(function() {

  function old_way()
  {
    var i = 0, results = [];
    return (function()
    {
      for (i = 0; i <= 1000000; i++)
      {
        results[i] = i;
      }
      return results;
    })();// replaced apply
  }

  var i;
  for(i = 0; i != 10; i++)
  {
    old_way();
  }

})();// replaced call
console.timeEnd('js');

The limit value of the for loop is low, because any higher it would be a pretty slow testing (10 * 1000000 calls)...

Results

Chrome:  coffee: 305.000ms;   js: 258.000ms;
IE Edge: coffee: 5.944,281ms; js: 3.517,72ms;
Firefox: coffee: 174.23ms;    js: 159.55ms;

Here I must have to mention, that not always coffee was the slowest in this test. You can see that by testing those codes in firefox.

My final answer:

First to say - I am not really familiar with coffeescript, but I looked into it, because I am using the Atom Editor and wanted to try to build my first package there, but drived back to Javascript... So if there is anything wrong you can correct me.

With coffeescript you can write less code, but if it comes to optimization, the code gets heavy. My own opinion -> I don't see any so called "productiveness" in this Coffeescripting language...

To get back to the performances :: The most used browser is the Chrome Browser (src: w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp) with 60% and my testings also have shown that manually typed Javascript runs a bit faster than Coffeescript (except IE ... - much faster). I would recommend Coffeescript for smaller projects, but if no one minds, stay the language you like.

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