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I'm still learning Haskell, and I was wondering if there is a less verbose way to express the below statement using 1 line of code:

map (\x -> (x, (if mod x 3 == 0 then "fizz" else "") ++ 
 if mod x 5 == 0 then "buzz" else "")) [1..100]

Produces: [(1,""),(2,""),(3,"fizz"),(4,""),(5,"buzz"),(6,"fizz"),(7,""),(8,""),(9,"fizz"),(10,"buzz"),(11,""),(12,"fizz"),(13,""),(14,""),(15,"fizzbuzz"),(16,""),(17,""),(18,"fizz"),(19,""),(20,"buzz"),(21,"fizz"),(22,""),(23,""),(24,"fizz"),(25,"buzz"),(26,""),(27,"fizz"),(28,""),(29,""),(30,"fizzbuzz"), etc

It just feels like I'm fighting the syntax more than I should. I've seen other questions for this in Haskell, but I'm looking for the most optimal way to express this in a single statement (trying to understand how to work the syntax better).

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haskell.org/haskellwiki/… –  Daniel Wagner Jan 28 '12 at 19:49
    
@Sergio, don't be silly. You just need 2 PhD's :P –  Jonathan Dunlap Jan 28 '12 at 23:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you insist on a one-liner:

[(x, concat $ ["fizz" | mod x 3 == 0] ++ ["buzz" | mod x 5 == 0]) | x <- [1..100]]
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this seems very close to what I'm thinking. Any way to boil this down so that concat isn't needed? Reading it logically, the concat is a form of behavioral noise to me. It reads: make an array that steps 1 to 100 with each element being concat with two arrays containing a single string element pushed onto each other (..etc). –  Jonathan Dunlap Jan 28 '12 at 21:37
2  
By the way, lists in Haskell are singly-linked lists, not arrays; arrays (such as those in the array and vector packages) are used relatively infrequently compared to other languages. –  ehird Jan 28 '12 at 22:01
    
marking this as the answer as it reads the best as a 1-liner statement without compounding statements like 'where'. I also like that the expression is built entirely inside a list definition giving it more semantic context. –  Jonathan Dunlap Jan 29 '12 at 0:07
    
You could use join instead of concat –  pat Jan 29 '12 at 6:37
1  
If you want to get rid of concat, replace the corresponding expression with: [f | f <- "fizz", mod x 3 == 0] ++ [b | b <- "buzz", mod x 5 == 0]. hammar's abuse of list comprehension is now even worse. –  Rafael Caetano Jan 30 '12 at 4:06

I think the reason why you feel like you are fighting the syntax is because you are mixing too many types.

Instead of trying to print:

[(1, ""), (2,""), (3,"Fizz")...]

Just think of printing strings:

["1","2","Fizz"...]

My attempt:

Prelude> let fizzBuzz x | x `mod` 15 == 0 = "FizzBuzz" | x `mod` 5 == 0 = "Buzz" | x `mod` 3 == 0 = "Fizz" | otherwise = show x
Prelude> [fizzBuzz x | x <-[1..100]]

["1","2","Fizz","4","Buzz","Fizz","7","8","Fizz","Buzz","11","Fizz","13","14","FizzBuzz"...]

In order to convert an Int to String you use the:

show x
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Writer monad may look nice (if you don't like concat):

fizzBuzz = [(x, execWriter $ when (x `mod` 3 == 0) (tell "fizz") >> when (x `mod` 5 == 0)  (tell "buzz")) | x <- [1..100]]

It's not particularly succinct though.

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We need no stinkin' mod...

zip [1..100] $ zipWith (++) (cycle ["","","fizz"]) (cycle ["","","","","buzz"])

or slightly shorter

import Data.Function(on)

zip [1..100] $ (zipWith (++) `on` cycle) ["","","fizz"] ["","","","","buzz"]

Or the brute force way:

zip [1..100] $ cycle ["","","fizz","","buzz","fizz","","","fizz","buzz","","fizz","","","fizzbuzz"]
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Couldn't resist going in the other direction and making it more complicated. Look, no mod...

merge as@(a@(ia,sa):as') bs@(b@(ib,sb):bs') =
  case compare ia ib of
    LT -> a : merge as' bs
    GT -> b : merge as  bs'
    EQ -> (ia, sa++sb) : merge as' bs'
merge as bs = as ++ bs

zz (n,s) = [(i, s) | i <- [n,2*n..]]
fizzBuzz = foldr merge [] $ map zz [(1,""), (3,"fizz"), (5,"buzz")]
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1  
my head exploded, thanks –  Jonathan Dunlap Jan 28 '12 at 23:58

Along the same lines as larsmans' answer:

fizzBuzz = [(x, f 3 "fizz" x ++ f 5 "buzz" x) | x <- [1..100]]
  where f k s n | n `mod` k == 0 = s
                | otherwise      = ""
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that's essentially what I just did: [ (x, "Fizz" `ifDivisibleBy` 3 ++ "Buzz" `ifDivisibleBy` 5) | x <- [1..100], let ifDivisibleBy s n = if x `mod` n == 0 then s else "" ] –  rampion Jan 28 '12 at 19:52

How's about...

fizzBuzz  =  [(x, fizz x ++ buzz x) | x <- [1..100]]
  where fizz n | n `mod` 3 == 0  =  "fizz"
               | otherwise       =  ""
        buzz n | n `mod` 5 == 0  =  "buzz"
               | otherwise       =  ""
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