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Can someone tell me why in the world this doesn't work? The code below is the entire contents of the file prog.rb

class String
    def to_b
        return true if self == "true"
        false
    end
end

Here is the error:

path/prog.rb:1: syntax error, unexpected keyword_def, expecting
<' or ';' or '\n'
             return true if self =...
                ^

There are no bad characters in the file and I'm using Ruby 1.9.3. The code is tested in IRB and found to work.

Is this a bug?

Thanks

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4  
BTW you could write that method simply as def to_b; self == "true"; end. –  Jakub Hampl Jan 28 '12 at 20:29
1  
Works just fine; suspect your encoding or funky characters. What did you use to edit it? –  Dave Newton Jan 28 '12 at 20:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

My guess is that there's an issue with how your editor is saving carriage returns. It's saying it expected a < or ; or \n -- which means it didn't detect the \n (carriage return) that should have been present at the end of the class String line.

Check your editor's carriage return settings and re-save the file.

share|improve this answer
    
Definitely a possibility. itdoesntwork, what platform are you on and what are you using to edit the .rb file? –  bob Jan 28 '12 at 20:35
    
@bob I'm on Windows 7, using Notepad++. –  itdoesntwork Jan 29 '12 at 15:00
    
@DylanMarkow Yeah, I think I accidentally set it to one of them - CR or LF, not to CR+LF. Fixed by just copying and pasting into another file :) –  itdoesntwork Jan 29 '12 at 15:03

This is probably the correct way of doing it:

class String
    def to_b
        return (self == "true")
    end
end
share|improve this answer
2  
+0.5 due to the unidiomatic "return" ;-) –  tokland Jan 28 '12 at 20:36

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