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I want to create a subclass of Date.

A normal, healthy, young rubyist, unscarred by the idiosyncrasy of Date's implementation would go about this in the following manner:

require 'date'

class MyDate < Date

  def initialize(year, month, day)
    @original_month = month
    @original_day = day

    # Christmas comes early!
    super(year, 12, 25)
  end

end

And proceed to use it in the most expected manner...

require 'my_date'

mdt = MyDate.new(2012, 1, 28)

puts mdt.to_s

... only to be double-crossed by the fact, that the Date::new method is actually an alias to Date::civil, which doesn't ever call initialize. In this case, the last piece of code prints "2012-01-28" instead of the expected "2012-12-25".

Dear Ruby-community, wtf is this?

Is there some very good reason for aliasing new, so that it ignores initialize, and as a result, any common sense and regard for the client's programmer's mental health?

share|improve this question
1  
By whose definition of "good"? –  Dave Newton Jan 28 '12 at 22:21
    
What's the alternative? If you call civil from initialize, you've allocated an object you don't need. –  pguardiario Jan 28 '12 at 23:08
    
Well, it just seems semantically wrong to allocate and initialize an object in the same method. I mean, if civil is the de-facto new, why not make it call initialize in the end? It may be a pure formality in Date, but it will allow to extend the class without the need to actually dig through its implementation details. Hence, I wondered, why the decision to alias civil to new could've been made? –  jst Jan 29 '12 at 9:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You define initialize, but you create the new instance with new. new returns a new instance of the class, not the result of initialize.

You may do:

require 'date'

class MyDate < Date

  def self.new(year, month, day)
    @original_month = month
    @original_day = day

    # Christmas comes early!
    super(year, 12, 25)
  end

end

mdt = MyDate.new(2012, 1, 28)

puts mdt.to_s

Remark: @original_month and @original_day are not available in this solution. The following solution extends Date, so you can access the original month and day. For normal dates, the values will be nil.

require 'date'

class Date 
  attr_accessor :original_month 
  attr_accessor :original_day
end  

class MyDate < Date

  def self.new(year, month, day)

    # Christmas comes early!
    date = super(year, 12, 25)
    date.original_month = month
    date.original_day = day
    date
  end

end

mdt = MyDate.new(2012, 1, 28)

puts mdt.to_s
puts mdt.original_month

But I would recommend:

require 'date'

class MyDate < Date

  def self.create(year, month, day)
    @original_month = month
    @original_day = day

    # Christmas comes early!
    new(year, 12, 25)
  end

end

mdt = MyDate.create(2012, 1, 28)

puts mdt.to_s

or

require 'date'

class Date

  def this_year_christmas
    # Christmas comes early!
    self.class.new(year, 12, 28)
  end

end

mdt = Date.new(2012, 1, 28).this_year_christmas

puts mdt.to_s
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the great answer! I ended up overloading the new method. It just seems very strange, that the allocation and initialization of the object happen in one method. –  jst Jan 29 '12 at 9:46
    
In your self.create definition, the instance vars are being set on the class, not the instance. Using instance_variable_set on the result of new will take care of that; just make sure you still return the instance. –  Kelvin Oct 9 '13 at 22:42

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