Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on an internal project for my company, and part of the project is to be able to generate various "Math Problems" in a factory design.

  • To generate problems, must specify the level of difficulty in the factory.
  • Each ProblemFactory contains abstracts methods as ConfigureXLevels and Generate.
  • Provides a Random variable.
  • Contains a dictionary which contains the available levels (key:=Levels, value:=IConfiguration which works like a container of objects useful to generate the problem (for example binary and times tables both needs two Bound objects)).

_

public abstract class ProblemFactory
{
    private IDictionary<Levels, IConfiguration> Configurations = new Dictionary<Levels, IConfiguration>();
    protected Random Random = new Random();

    public ProblemFactory() {
        LoadLevels();
    }

    protected abstract Problem Generate();
    protected abstract IConfiguration ConfigureEasyLevel();
    protected abstract IConfiguration ConfigureMediumLevel();
    protected abstract IConfiguration ConfigureHardLevel();

    private void LoadLevels() {
            Configurations.Add(Levels.Easy, ConfigureEasyLevel();
            Configurations.Add(Levels.Medium, ConfigureMediumLevel();
            Configurations.Add(Levels.Hard, ConfigureHardLevel();
    }
} 

And here is a concrete class about create addition problems, check how I'm overriding some ConfigureXLevel from the abstract ProblemFactory and returnsIConfiguration.

public class AdditionProblemFactory : ProblemFactory
{
    public override Problem Generate() {
        int x = //.. x must receive a random number according to the configuration selected for the level
        int y =  //.. 
        Operators op = Operator.Addition

        return BinaryProblem.CreateProblem(x, y, op);
    }

    protected override IConfiguration ConfigureEasyLevel() {
        // the same of ConfigureMediumLevel() but with others values
    }

    protected override IConfiguration ConfigureMediumLevel() {
        BinaryProblemConfiguration configuration = new BinaryProblemConfiguration();
        configuration.Bound1 = new Bound<int>(100, 1000);
        configuration.Bound2 = new Bound<int>(10, 100);

        return configuration;
    }

    protected override IConfiguration ConfigureHardLevel() {
        // the same of ConfigureMediumLevel() but with others values
    }
}

public class BinaryProblemConfiguration : IConfiguration
{
    public Bound<int> Bound1 { get; set; }  //Bounds for Number1 of a binary problem
    public Bound<int> Bound2 { get; set; } // Bounds…    Number2  …
}

The matter is in the Generate method from AdditionProblemFactory and TimesTablesProblemFactory, x, y should receive random numbers according to the Level IConfiguration.

Bound class contains Min and Max values. For example is I select Levels.Medium, I must receive a problem with the specific range or bound in Number1 and Number2 (Number 1 + Number 2 = X )

    AdditionProblemFactory factory = new AdditionProblemFactory();
    BinaryProblem problem = (BinaryProblem)factory.Generate(Levels.Medium);

Here is the part which I don't know what should I modify in the design. Random is on ProblemFactory, but maybe is better to move the variable to IConfiguration and generate numbers there.

If you prefer to download it. Don't worry, it's so small. http://www.mediafire.com/?z5j9hu1szpuu2u5

share|improve this question
    
@L.B Sorry for that. I didn't know that I shouldn't do this. I just wanted to be more shortly in my explanation. I'll bear in mind next time. –  Darf Zon Jan 29 '12 at 0:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

By doing some refactoring, I would suggest creating the following class hierarchy:

public interface IConfiguration
{
     Bound<int> Bound1 { get; }
     Bound<int> Bound2 { get; }
}

public class EasyLevelConfiguration : IConfiguration
{
    public Bound<int> Bound1
    {
        get { return new Bound<int>(100, 1000); }
    }

    public Bound<int> Bound2
    {
        get { return new Bound<int>(10, 100); }
    }   
}

and change the implementation of your ProblemGeneratorFactory as follows:

public override Problem Generate(IConfiguration configuration)
{
    int x = this.Random.Next(configuration.Bound1.Max); //use value from configuration
    int y = this.Random.Next(configuration.Bound2.Min); //use value from configuration
    Operators op = Operator.Addition
    return BinaryProblem.CreateProblem(x, y, op);
}

Alternatively, you can provide the various IConfiguration objects in the constructor for the ProblemFactory and have different instances of it for various configurations.

share|improve this answer
    
In the post, IConfiguration is a marker interface. Others math problems which derives of Configuration has the necessary to generate the problem. In other words, not all the problems needs two bounds, some need just one, others needs another type of class, etcetera. I'm not sure if this affect the solution –  Darf Zon Jan 29 '12 at 1:31
    
@DarfZon, the important thing is that you try to seperate the different responsibilities from each other, and try to keep your classes/ interfaces as slim as possible. If you have other classes that need different members or methods, then those probably should be a separate interface. You can change the name of the IConfiguration interface above to IBinaryProblemConfiguration, for example. –  Can Gencer Jan 29 '12 at 9:28
    
I like the idea of separate the enum Levels to class. I'm still learning of these designs. Sorry if I upset, will you write how will be ProblemFactory class? I don't know how will it be change. –  Darf Zon Jan 29 '12 at 16:28
    
@DarfZon the factory class is the same as before, just get rid of the Configure* functions and change the method signature for Generate as above. –  Can Gencer Jan 29 '12 at 19:29

I would start by refactoring the factory class. have a class for each level of difficulty: EasyProblemFactory, MediumProblemFactory & DifficultProblemFactory. allow them to inherit from a common interface

interface IProblemFactory
{
    Problem Create();
}

then each implementation of the ProblemFactory can have it's own specific properties

class EasyProblemFactory
{
    Problem Create()
    {
        return new Problem(...);
    }

    public int X;
    public int Y;
}

class MediumProblemFactory
{
    Problem Create()
    {
        return new Problem(...);
    }

    public Bound<int> Range;
}
...

Now it's a matter of configuring each factory, independent of the other types of factories Depending on how the factories are instantiated and which, if any, IoC container you use, will determine how you configure the factories.

Another option is to replace the factory objects with command objects and chain the commands together. for example a command for add, subtract, multiple, divide. then chain these commands together to build the problem. you could even create commands for exponent, pi, logarithmic functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for take a look of my code. I've got a doubt about the IoC, I really have no idea of it. Can you explain more about that container and how can I use it? –  Darf Zon Jan 29 '12 at 1:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.