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I'm wondering if there is a "better" way to do this:

class Foo {
    final public function bar() {
        if (is_subclass_of(get_called_class(), __CLASS__)) {
            throw new Exception();
        }
    }
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    public function baz() {
        parent::bar(); // shouldn't be allowed
    }
}

Essentially, I want certain methods in my parent class to prohibit child classes from calling them. This needs to be bullet-proof, which I doubt this is, so if you know how this could be circumvented, that's what I'm interested in knowing (along with how to prevent it, if possible).

Edit: For everyone suggesting private methods, this is not an option, as I need the interface to remain public to be externally accessible. Sorry, I guess I assumed that would be obvious.

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3  
Erm, making it private does this? –  Wrikken Jan 29 '12 at 0:17
    
@Wrikken, lol.. I edited my question. –  drrcknlsn Jan 29 '12 at 0:32
2  
A function that can be called publicly by anyone, but not by the object itself? That's rather... weird. Maybe you're trying to defend a little too vigorously against your own programers/subclassers? :) –  deceze Jan 29 '12 at 0:37
    
In that case: I would say if you need this it is a design problem, and Bar shouldn't inherit from Foo in the first place... But let's try some methods. Is an instance method ($this->bar()) also not allowed or only a call to parent::bar()? –  Wrikken Jan 29 '12 at 0:40
    
@deceze: I have a very good reason for wanting this behavior. I'm trying to make a learning "game" whereby participants extend a parent class and submit their new child class which is then injected into the game. I want these submitted classes to be somewhat sandboxed, so they can't cheat and break the game for other participants (as much as plausible within the limitations of PHP). –  drrcknlsn Jan 29 '12 at 1:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
class Foo {
    final public function bar() {
        if (is_subclass_of(get_called_class(), __CLASS__)) {
            throw new Exception('No cookies for you!');
        }
        echo 'Failure!';
    }
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    public function baz() {
        try{
                Foo::bar(); // shouldn't be allowed
        } catch (Exception $e){
                echo $e->getMessage();
        }
        try{
                $func = function() {Foo::bar();}; // is allowed, nags somewhat about it should't be called statically..
                $func();
        } catch (Exception $e){
                echo $e->getMessage();
        }
    }
}
$b = new Bar();
$b->baz();
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Ah.. closures never crossed my mind. Is there a way to prevent this, or alter my design to disallow it? +1 –  drrcknlsn Jan 29 '12 at 1:43
    
This particular one with calling debug_backtrace() and stepping through it. I will counter you by calling register_shutdown_function($func);.... –  Wrikken Jan 29 '12 at 1:52
    
Touche. I think I'm going to have to do some more research on sandboxing, disallowing certain functions, etc. Thanks for your help. –  drrcknlsn Jan 29 '12 at 2:14

This is not going to be "bulletproof". And I don't think there's anything you can do to make it so.

Fact of the matter is, a PHP process is usually running in an interpreter with filesystem access to the local server - as a relatively-unprivileged user. But that's still enough to open /proc/self/mem, which provides read-write access to the memory space of the current process. Using that, you could go into the memory the PHP interpreter is using and NOP over the bit of code you thought was providing your bulletproof security.

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Im not sure if this helps, but private functions in parent classes cant be called by child classes. But if you need it to be public i think you would have to declare baz() in each child and throw an exception...

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I edited my question.. private is not an option. Also, neither is modifying child classes, as those aren't created by me. –  drrcknlsn Jan 29 '12 at 0:33

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