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string sequence = "12345";
int[] ziffern = new int[sequence.Count()];
for (int i = 0; i < sequence.Count(); i++)
{
    ziffern[i] =  Convert.ToInt32(sequence.ElementAt(i));
}

It does not work like that. How can I access every single number?

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What is the actual problem you are having? And what do you mean by access every single number? –  ose Jan 29 '12 at 0:50
    
I want to store the 1, 2 etc in an array. But like I did it above it does not work. –  chrismeo Jan 29 '12 at 0:52
    
I voted up your question because I had fun with it and to be nice to a new user... so you'll get a couple extra points! –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 29 '12 at 1:53
    
Thank you so much!!! –  chrismeo Jan 29 '12 at 1:59
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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ElementAt will return a char.

When you convert a char to an Int32, you will get the ASCII code of the character.

Try this:

 string sequence = "12345";
 int[] ziffern = new int[sequence.Length];
 for (int i = 0; i < sequence.Length; i++)
 {
       ziffern[i] = Convert.ToInt32(sequence.Substring(i, 1));
 }
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Works! Thanks a lot! –  chrismeo Jan 29 '12 at 0:56
    
I wanted to vote you up, but infortunately I can't because I haven't enough reputation yet sry. –  chrismeo Jan 29 '12 at 0:58
    
Great to hear. On stack overflow, if an answer works for you, it is considered good practice to accept it as the correct answer so anyone searching for it in future can find it quicker. –  ose Jan 29 '12 at 1:00
    
A better choice than Convert.ToInt32() would be Int32.Parse(sequence[i].ToString()) -- the former actually calls Int32.Parse anyway, thus it is faster to call directly. The syntax sequence[i].ToString() is the same as sequence.Substring(i, 1) but is also faster. Using Int32.Parse opens you to exceptions occurring if a non-digit is in your sequence. See my answer which uses Int32.TryParse if this could be a problem. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 29 '12 at 1:17
    
I see. Thanks a lot! –  chrismeo Jan 29 '12 at 1:19
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You mean 'every single digit'?

string sequence = "12345";
int[] ziffern = new int[sequence.Length];
int idx = 0;
foreach (char c in sequence)
{
    if (int.TryParse(c.ToString(), out ziffern[idx])) idx++;
}
// idx contains # of valid digits found

See Int32.TryParse(string, out int) at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/f02979c7.aspx

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You should use sequence.Length instead of Count() extension method. Both string and int[] have this property.

A string is actually equivalent to char[], so use it.

string sequence = "12345";
int[] ziffern = new int[sequence.Length];
for (int i = 0; i < sequence.Length; i++)
{
    ziffern[i] =  Convert.ToInt32(sequence[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This wrongly returns ASCII codes. You need sequence[i].ToString() to convert the char to a string. Also, use Int32.Parse() or Int32.TryParse() instead of Convert.ToInt32() which ends up calling Int32.Parse() anyway. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 29 '12 at 1:36
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You used GetNumericValue method (Convert.ToInt32) which converts a Char object that represents a number to a numeric value type. Therefore its the ASCII code that is returned from that method. Use Parse and TryParse to convert a character in a string into a Char object. Use ToString to convert a Char object to a String object. Try this:

string sequence = "12345";
int[] ziffern = new int[sequence.Count()];
int bar;
for (int i = 0; i < sequence.Count(); i++)
{
    if (!int.TryParse(sequence.ElementAt(i).ToString(), out bar))
    {
    //Do something to correct the problem
    }
    else
    {
       ziffern[i] =  bar;
    }
}
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This needlessly relies on LINQ. The string class does not contain a Count() method or ElementAt() method, but DOES contain the Length property and the default item property sequence[i]. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 29 '12 at 1:33
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Here is a Linq solution to turning it into an int[] also:

    public int[] ExtractNumbers(string numbers)
    {
        return numbers
            .ToCharArray()
            .Select(x => Int32.Parse(x.ToString(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture)))
            .ToArray();
    }
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LINQ does this nicely:

string sequence = "12345";
var ziffern = sequence.Select(c => (int)(c - '0')).ToArray();

Alternatively you could use the Char.GetNumericValue(char c) method in there, which would also handle characters like ⅓ in the string.

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I love playing with the LINQ syntax, but I would not use the minus operator for converting ASCII to value. It's just going to open you up to negative return values and it obfuscates the purpose. Use Int32.Parse() or Int32.TryParse(). I don't think I would use LINQ on this problem either. Not totally positive, but I'm pretty sure a simple loop boils down to tighter and faster code. Maybe not after compiler optimization, but I feel that using LINQ because you can isn't always the way to go. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 29 '12 at 1:24
    
@KevinP.Rice Agreed. In reality I would refactor into an extension method and include some validation. If performance is important, I would measure different approaches to find the fastest. –  James Jan 29 '12 at 1:39
    
You've made me curious how LINQ compares after all the compiler optimizations happen. There's some really creative LINQ suggestions at times that would truly invoke some pretty heavy resources compared to a plain and boring loop. I'm not sure your code does that... but I don't know what type of container is instantiated which is then converted to an array. Populating an array in the first place (I'm pretty sure) would be faster and involve fewer resources. I avoid LINQ unless it's the best-fit solution. Also LINQ requires .NET 3.5 which adds another requirement to your code. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 29 '12 at 1:51
    
@KevinP.Rice Sounds like you're overthinking a little! It's unlikely that this will be used with huge strings so we're aiming for clean code that works. Good point about the container - I know Select returns IEnumerable<char> but I'm not sure what's going on under the hood. Maybe a linked list? Let me know if you find out. –  James Jan 29 '12 at 2:08
    
Best I can find is Select returns a concrete private type called System.Linq.Enumerable.SelectIterator<T>. I'd guess this is a char iterator for the sequence string. Building this iterator requires overhead. Also, remember LINQ execution is deferred and there is some overhead for that feature. All in all, LINQ is only slightly slower, but I avoid it if the only purpose is compacting three lines to one. I might replace your LINQ with sequence.Select(c => Int32.Parse(c.ToString())).ToArray() which will PROPERLY throw an exception for non-digit chars & avoids char subtraction. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 29 '12 at 23:41
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int[] numbers = new int[sequence.Length];

for(int i=0; i<sequence.Length; i++)
{
    numbers[i] = Convert.ToInt32(sequence[i].ToString());
}
share|improve this answer
    
In this code sequence[i] returns a char which invokes Convert.ToInt32(char) which returns an ASCII code, NOT the numeric value! You need to write sequence[i].ToString() instead which invokes Convert.ToInt32(string). –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 29 '12 at 1:31
    
I didn't test it... thanks for noticing this... code updated –  Robin Van Persi Jan 29 '12 at 1:34
1  
No worries. I had to test and update my answer too! :) I'd rather comment than vote down. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 29 '12 at 1:40
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