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I need to implement a functor that takes any (!) function pointer when instantiated, analyses the argument types, stores the pointer and when operator() is called, does something with the pointer. The easiest case being, calling the function with its arguments.

I tried converting the function pointer to something like std::function and I get the error:

error: invalid use of incomplete type ‘struct std::function<void (*)(...)>’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/functional:1572:11: error: declaration of ‘struct std::function<void(*)(...)>’

I am using gcc 4.6.1, compiling with -std=c++0x

This is a minimal example:

#include <functional>

using namespace std;
typedef void (*F_vararg)(...);
class Foo
{
    public:
        template<typename... ARGS> Foo(function<F_vararg(ARGS... args)> f);
        ~Foo(){}
        template<typename... ARGS>void operator()(ARGS... args);
    private:
        F_vararg m_f;
};

template<typename... ARGS> 
Foo::Foo(function<F_vararg(ARGS... args)> f)
{
    m_f = f;
}

template<typename... ARGS>
void Foo::operator()(ARGS... args)
{
    m_f(args...);
}

void func1(double *a1, double *a2, double *b)
{    //do something 
}

int main(void)
{
    Foo func1_functor((std::function<void (*)(...)>)(func1));

    double a1[3] = {2.,3.,4.};
    double a2[3] = {2.2,3.2,4.2};
    double b[3] = {1.5,2.5,3.5};

    func1_functor(a1,a2,b);

    return 0;
}

This does NOT compile... If I don't declare the constructor as a template but with "F_vararg f" as the argument, and adjust the cast in the instantiation accordingly, it works (should it?) but I have no chance (?) of getting any information on the arguments of func1 in the constructor of the functor which I need.

Am I missing something? Is there another way to do that?

Thank you in advance !!!

cheers, Steffen

edit Wow, that was quick! I need that for postponing the execution of functions. The functor (or another class) should be able to decide whether and when to run a function. To decide that it will use the information gathered from the argument list.

I have looked at std::bind but I couldn't think of a way to achieve what I want...

share|improve this question
    
typedef void (*F_vararg)(...); - that's a C-style vararg function, and you don't need it at all with variadic templates.. –  vines Jan 29 '12 at 1:07
2  
What do you need it for? –  Cat Plus Plus Jan 29 '12 at 1:09
    
and yes, there's std::bind after all.. –  vines Jan 29 '12 at 1:10
    
This is currently very type-unsafe. Do you expect it to do type checking to ensure that the parameters match up? If so, you won't be able to just have a type Foo. You'll have to encode the argument types in the functor type, something like Foo<void,double,double,double> to represent a functor which returns a void and takes three doubles as arguments. –  Aaron McDaid Jan 29 '12 at 1:20
    
@Cat: What if you wanted to automatically log all parameters, before calling the function, and then log the return value. You could write a wrapper for each function signature, of course, or you could try to write a reusable templated logging wrapper. –  Ben Voigt Jan 29 '12 at 1:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Lose the typedef. A function that takes variable arguments is a specific type, it's not compatible with functions taking typed arguments, and it can't have parameter types specified later.

This should work instead:

template<typename... ARGS> Foo(function<void(*)(ARGS... args)> f);

Of course, what you really need is to template the class, so you can remember what arguments the function requires.

#include <functional>

template<typename... ARGS>
class Foo
{
    std::function<void(ARGS...)> m_f;
public:
    Foo( std::function<void(ARGS...)> f ) : m_f(f) {}
    void operator()(ARGS... args) const { m_f(args...); }
};

template<typename... ARGS>
Foo<ARGS...> MakeFoo(void(*f)(ARGS...)) { return Foo<ARGS...>(f); }

void func1(double *a1, double *a2, double *b)
{    //do something 
}

int main(void)
{
    auto func1_functor = MakeFoo(func1);

    double a1[3] = {2.,3.,4.};
    double a2[3] = {2.2,3.2,4.2};
    double b[3] = {1.5,2.5,3.5};

    func1_functor(a1,a2,b);

    return 0;
}

Demo: http://ideone.com/fnUg2

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that looks promising. But how will I instantiate the functor in main? –  steffen Jan 29 '12 at 1:23
    
@user1175824: Like this? –  Ben Voigt Jan 29 '12 at 1:27
    
Thanks @Ben! I corrected the ...args in the operator() definition (compiler error). There are still some compiler errors... But I feel we're getting closer :) --- error: ‘Foo<ARGS>::m_f’ has incomplete type ---- error: no matching function for call to ‘Foo<double*, double*, double*>::Foo(void (&)(double, double*, double*))’ --- candidates are: constexpr Foo<double*, double*, double*>::Foo(const Foo<double*, double*, double*>&) ----- –  steffen Jan 29 '12 at 1:41
    
@steffen: I found and fixed those problems; it's working now. –  Ben Voigt Jan 29 '12 at 1:43
    
Yeah! That did it!!! please vote for this solution ;) Thanks, Ben –  steffen Jan 29 '12 at 1:53

To be type-safe, Foo should also encode the type of the arguments. The question doesn't specify the use-case fully, so I'm not sure if it is required to be able to pass 'typeless' Foos around and still have each one somehow remember (at runtime) what the types of its arguments are. Anyway, this code will work with the example given in the qeustion.

#include<utility>

template<typename FunctionType>
struct Foo {
        FunctionType f;
        Foo(FunctionType f_) : f(f_) {}

        template<typename... Args>
        void operator() (Args&&... args) {
                f(  std::forward<Args>(args)... );
        }
};

template<typename FunctionType>
Foo<FunctionType> foo(FunctionType f) {
        return Foo<FunctionType>(f);
}

void func1(double *, double *, double *)
{    //do something 
}


int main() {
        auto x = foo(func1);
        double d[3] = {2,3,4};
        func1(d, d, d);
        x(d, d, d);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That looks good, I'm gonna try it as well! :) –  steffen Jan 29 '12 at 1:55

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