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I have a stacktrace for an app that includes the following nugget:

com.google.inject.internal.util.$ComputationException

What does the $ in front of the class name indicate?

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3 Answers 3

In the Java internals, the $ character is considered a valid identifier character just like letters or numbers. However, it's usually used internally by the compiler when generating things like inner classes.

From the Java Language Specification:

The Java letters include uppercase and lowercase ASCII Latin letters A-Z (\u0041-\u005a), and a-z (\u0061-\u007a), and, for historical reasons, the ASCII underscore (_, or \u005f) and dollar sign ($, or \u0024). The $ character should be used only in mechanically generated source code or, rarely, to access preexisting names on legacy systems.

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This does not appear to be an inner class, since there is no "outer" class name preceding the $ –  emmby Jan 29 '12 at 4:50
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You're asking about internal decisions made by your compiler about synthesized class naming. Outside the decisions made by your compiler, the $ and its position doesn't mean anything. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 29 '12 at 4:56
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It means that ComputationException is contained within another class or otherwise not publicly visible.

See http://www.retrologic.com/innerclasses.doc7.html .

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If ComputationException was contained within another class, wouldn't that other class's name be before the $? –  emmby Jan 29 '12 at 4:42
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@emmby Yes. Since this is a google package in an "inject.internal" namespace, I'm going to go ahead and say it was generated through some internal voodoo. I can't tell you what the class' purpose is, only what the $ means... And that's "this is not a human-written public class". –  Borealid Jan 29 '12 at 4:46
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The $ character should be used only in mechanically generated source code or, rarely, to access preexisting names on legacy systems.

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