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I am doing debug for a (pthread) multithread C++ program on Linux.

It works well when thread number is small such as 1, 2,3.

When thread number is increased, I got SIGSEGV (segmentation fault , UNIX signal 11).

But, the error sometimes appear and sometimes disappear when I increase thread number above 4.

I used valgrind, I got

==29655== Process terminating with default action of signal 11 (SIGSEGV)

==29655== Access not within mapped region at address 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF8

==29655== at 0x3AEB69CA3E: std::string::assign(std::string const&) (in /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6.0.8)

==29655== by 0x42A93C: bufferType::getSenderID(std::string&) const (boundedBuffer.hpp:29)

It seems that my code tried to read a memory which is not allocated. But, I cannot find any bugs in the function getSenderID(). It only return a string of a member data in Class bufferType. It has been initialized.

I used GDB and DDD (GDB GUI) to find the bug , which also points there but the error sometimes disappear so that in GDB, I cannot capture it with breakpoint.

Moreover, I also print out values of the function pointed by valgrind, but it is not helpful because multiple threads print out results with different orders and they interleave with each other. Each time I run the code, the print-output is different.

The bufferType is in a map, the map may have multiple entries. Each entry can be written by one thread and read by another thread at the same time. I have used pthread read/write lock to lock a pthread_rwlock_t. Now, there is no SIGSEGV but the program stops in some point without progress. I think this is a deadlock. But, one map entry can only be written by only one thread at one time point, why still have deadlock ?

Would you please recommend some methods to capture the bug so that I can find it no matter how many threads I use to run the code.

thanks

The code of boundedBuffer.hpp is as follows:

 class bufferType
 {
 private:

    string senderID;// who write the buffer

    string recvID; // who should read the buffer

    string arcID; // which arc is updated

    double price; // write node's price 

    double arcValue; // this arc flow value 

    bool   updateFlag ;

    double arcCost;


    int  arcFlowUpBound; 

    //boost::mutex  senderIDMutex; 

    //pthread_mutex_t  senderIDMutex; 

    pthread_rwlock_t       senderIDrwlock;

    pthread_rwlock_t    setUpdateFlaglock;

  public: 
   //typedef boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock;  // synchronous read / write 

   bufferType(){}

   void   getPrice(double& myPrice ) const {myPrice = price;}

   void   getArcValue(double& myArcValue ) const {myArcValue = arcValue;}

   void   setPrice(double& myPrice){price = myPrice;}

   void   setArcValue(double& myValue ){arcValue = myValue;}

   void   readBuffer(double& myPrice, double& myArcValue );

   void   writeBuffer(double& myPrice, double& myArcValue );

   void   getSenderID(string& myID) 

   {
       //boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(senderIDMutex);
      //pthread_rwlock_rdlock(&senderIDrwlock); 
      cout << "senderID is " << senderID << endl ; 
      myID = senderID;
      //pthread_rwlock_unlock(&senderIDrwlock);
   }
//void   setSenderID(string& myID){ senderID = myID ;}

    void   setSenderID(string& myID)

    { 
        pthread_rwlock_wrlock(&senderIDrwlock); 

            senderID = myID ;

            pthread_rwlock_unlock(&senderIDrwlock);
    }

    void   getRecvID(string& myID) const {myID = recvID;}

    void   setRecvID(string& myID){ recvID = myID ;}

    void   getArcID(string& myID) const {myID  = arcID ;}

    void   setArcID(string& myID){arcID = myID ;}

    void   getUpdateFlag(bool& myFlag)
    {
            myFlag = updateFlag ; 

        if (updateFlag)

           updateFlag  = false; 
    }

//void   setUpdateFlag(bool myFlag){ updateFlag = myFlag ;}

    void   setUpdateFlag(bool myFlag)
    { 
        pthread_rwlock_wrlock(&setUpdateFlaglock);

        updateFlag = myFlag ;

         pthread_rwlock_unlock(&setUpdateFlaglock);

    }

   void   getArcCost(double& myc) const {myc = arcCost; }

   void   setArcCost(double& myc){ arcCost = myc ;}

   void   setArcFlowUpBound(int& myu){ arcFlowUpBound = myu ;}

   int    getArcFlowUpBound(){ return arcFlowUpBound ;}

   //double getLastPrice() const {return price; }

   } ;

From the code, you can see that I have tried to use read/write lock to assure invariant. Each entry in map has a buffer like this above. Now, I have got deadlock.

share|improve this question
4  
Usually caused by some sort of race condition. Examine closely how shared data is accessed & modified. You can't find these sort of bugs by looking at a single function -- you have to look at all code that could possibly be executing simultaneously. –  mcmcc Jan 29 '12 at 5:07
    
Multithreaded programs are notoriously difficult to debug. You most likely have a race condition which means that you're most likely screwing up locking somewhere. Can you paste code, or is there too much? Sadly, printf is often the best tool. There are race detection programs out there. –  Nathan Binkert Jan 29 '12 at 5:11

3 Answers 3

Access not within mapped region at address 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF8

at 0x3AEB69CA3E: std::string::assign(std::string const&)

This would normally mean that you are assigning to a string* that was NULL, and then got decremented. Example:

#include <string>

int main()
{
  std::string *s = NULL;

  --s;
  s->assign("abc");
}

g++ -g t.cc && valgrind -q ./a.out

...
==20980== Process terminating with default action of signal 11 (SIGSEGV): dumping core
==20980==  Access not within mapped region at address 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF8
==20980==    at 0x4EDCBE6: std::string::assign(char const*, unsigned long)
==20980==    by 0x400659: main (/tmp/t.cc:8)

...

So show us the code in boundedBuffer.hpp (with line numbers), and think how that code could end up with a string pointer that points at -8.

Would you please recommend some methods to capture the bug so that I can find it no matter how many threads I use to run the code.

When thinking about multi-threaded programs, you must think about invariants. You should put assertions to confirm that your invariants do hold. You should think how they might be violated, and what violations would cause the post-mortem state you have observed.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed (+1). In this case it looks like another thread trying to assign something to object string which is not inited. Also it sometimes usefull to enable coredump with ulimit and analyze it using core. –  Sergey Jan 29 '12 at 6:31
    
@Sergey7, would you please tell me how to do enable coredump with ulimit and analyze it using core ? I need to add something in my C++ code ? thanks –  user1002288 Jan 29 '12 at 6:40
    
Actually, this answer may be close, but I'd suspect that the NULL pointer shenanigans actually occurs inside the std::string object. GCC's std::string implementation contains a pointer to the char data and decrements that pointer to get to the length, capacity and refcount fields. See bits/basic_string.h for details. I'd guess that the internal pointer in the `std::string is being corrupted (to NULL) somewhere. –  Michael Burr Jan 29 '12 at 8:14
    
@user1002288 1. compile your program with debug symbols - "gcc -g ...". 2. enable core dump with command - "ulimit -c unlimited" 3. execute your program till "Segmentation fault (core dumped)" 4. open executable with core "gdb <faulty program> core". 5. Investigate it with bt ... –  Sergey Jan 31 '12 at 14:15

Do you have any cases where an object (such as a string) is accessed in one thread while another thread is, or might be, modifying it? That's the usual cause of a problem like this.

share|improve this answer
    
The function getsenderID() is only parallel reading. So, I do not use mutex to lock it. I have used mutex to lock the critical section about parallel writing that set value for senderID. –  user1002288 Jan 29 '12 at 5:09
    
Well there's your problem. Your threads access it while another might be modifying it. That's prohibited. –  David Schwartz Jan 29 '12 at 5:12
    
Ah, this sort of thing can be a problem though depending on how you implemented it. Sometimes this sort of thing is safe, but in many cases, you should use a reader/writer lock. If you put the mutex in getsenderID(), does the problem go away? If so, that's a good indication that your assumptions are wrong. –  Nathan Binkert Jan 29 '12 at 5:13

Look at your instance of bufferType.

When was it instantiated?

If it was instantiated before threads were spawned, and then one of the threads modified it, you have a race condition without a lock.

Also, watch out for any static variables anywhere near or inside that bufferType.

From the looks of it, one of the threads probably has modified the member that returned by getSenderID().

If none of these problems are causing your error, try using valgrind's drd.

share|improve this answer
    
The bufferType is in a map<string, bufferType>, the map may have multiple entries. Each entry can be written by one thread and read by another thread at the same time. I have used pthread read/write lock to lock a pthread_rwlock_t. Now, there is no SIGSEGV but the program stops in some point without progress. I think this is a deadlock. But, one map entry can only be written by only one thread at one time point, why still have deadlock ? –  user1002288 Jan 29 '12 at 6:21
    
A deadlock is only possible when you have more than one lock. Have you tried one mutex lock used for both read and write to the mutex? Simply lock before read/write and unlock when done. That should work fine. You cannot assume that if you write to different keys, you will be safe, because each write to the map can rebalance the tree. Also consider using drd - it will tell you right away if you have a race condition or a deadlock. –  kfmfe04 Jan 29 '12 at 6:25
    
I have used drd , but the output report is very veery long and too dense with a lot of very long useless c++ class standard implementation details. Would you please tell me how to find race condition or a deadlock from it ? thanks –  user1002288 Jan 29 '12 at 6:33
    
What you want to do is write a VERY SIMPLE test program, with just a map<string,int>. Spawn several threads to read and write to it, and set up the lock as you currently have it. Run drd on it and see what happens. –  kfmfe04 Jan 29 '12 at 6:59

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