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I found a nice little script on snippr(http://snipplr.com/view.php?codeview&id=799) that gives me the GET variables in an associative array.

// Read a page's GET URL variables and return them as an associative array.
function getUrlVars()
{
    var vars = [], hash;
    var hashes = window.location.href.slice(window.location.href.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&');

    for(var i = 0; i < hashes.length; i++)
    {
        hash = hashes[i].split('=');
        vars.push(hash[0]);
        vars[hash[0]] = hash[1];
    }

    return vars;
}

var get = getUrlVars(); 

I am trying to check to see if a certain GET variable is set and if the value is 'search'. For some reason my code is not catching the If statement and alerting even if the condition is not met.

if((get['search_housing']) = 'search') {
  alert('this works');
}

I'm not sure why it's not respecting my If statement. Is there something wrong with my code?

share|improve this question
1  
Tip: Look for a proper query string parser that performs URL-decoding. Perhaps: gist.github.com/143101 – Ates Goral Jan 29 '12 at 7:04
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The = operator sets the value.

You're looking for ==, which compares values:

if((get['search_housing']) == 'search') {
  alert('this works');
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for being little faster :) – Sarfraz Jan 29 '12 at 6:16

if((get['search_housing']) == 'search') {

DOUBLE equals!

share|improve this answer

Maybe it needs to be this:

if((get['search_housing']) == 'search') {
    alert('this works');
}

See, the = would mean you are trying to assign 'search' to the get[].

share|improve this answer
if(get('search_housing')==='search'){
  alert('test');
}
share|improve this answer

Try gup instead. That code you found doesn't look very robust. You probably want to unescape the returned value because you are comparing the results.

if (gup('search_housing') == 'search') { ... }

function gup( name )
{
  name = name.replace(/[\[]/,"\\\[").replace(/[\]]/,"\\\]");
  var regexS = "[\\?&]"+name+"=([^&#]*)";
  var regex = new RegExp( regexS );
  var results = regex.exec( window.location.href );
  if( results == null )
    return "";
  else
    return results[1];
}
share|improve this answer
    
No query string parser is robust without URL-decoding. – Ates Goral Jan 29 '12 at 7:03
    
@AtesGoral - made a note about unescaping, although personally I always do this outside the value retrieval because I want the encoded value. – mrtsherman Jan 29 '12 at 17:07
    
I can see fringe cases where you might want to do that, but in general, not handling unescaping in your parser is a violation of layers. – Ates Goral Jan 29 '12 at 19:03

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