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I want write a little code analyzer which parses nested structures and translates into valid CSS. However, I did't get to keep the identifiers that are inherited from upper level.

The nested structure:

#foo {
    border: 1px;
    a {
        border: 2px;
    }
    b {
        border: 3px;
        c {
            border: 4px; /* comment */
        }
    }
}

I want to translate the structure into:

#foo {
    border: 1px;
}

#foo a {
    border: 2px;
}

#foo b {
    border: 3px;
}

#foo b c {
    border: 4px; /* comment */
}

Parse code:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main() {

    string str = "\
    #foo {\
        border: 1px;\
        a {\
            border: 2px;\
        }\
        b {\
            border: 3px;\
            c {\
                border: 4px; /* comment */\
            }\
        }\
    }";

    string::const_iterator i = str.end(),
    begin = str.begin(), end;

    while (i != begin) {
        if (*i == ';' || (*i == '/' && *(i-1) == '*')) {
            end = i++;

            while (*i-- != '{');

            while (true) {
                if (*i == ';' || *i == '}' || *i == '{' || i == begin)
                    break;
                i--;
            }

            string item(++i, ++end);
            cout << item << "}" << endl;
        }
        i--;
    }

    return 0;
}

Out:

c {
    border: 4px; /* comment */
}

b {
    border: 3px;
}

a {
    border: 2px;
}

#foo {
    border: 1px;
}

So, how to keep the identifiers that are inherited from upper level?

share|improve this question
    
If you're not doing this purely as an exercise, realize that there are already things out there like LESS CSS which do this. –  icktoofay Jan 29 '12 at 9:02
    
@icktoofay, I know LESS very well and I want to do this using C++. Nested rules are the only thing left to do –  Alexander Guiness Jan 29 '12 at 9:07
    
You can keep the identifiers in a stack. You push/pop as you go down/up the hierarchy. –  Alexander Jan 31 '12 at 11:58
    
Your code won't even run. You can't dereference an iterator that is equal to end(). You need to use reverse iterators. –  Grimm The Opiner Feb 28 '12 at 14:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're using c++, why not use OO?

Create a class that represents a scope (a matched {} pair), which has a list of pointers to it's child scopes and a pointer to its parent scope: ie: from your example foo's list contains a and b, b's list contains c.

When printing out, recursively go into each leaf scope, then get it to print its 'full' name by adding the names of all its 'ancestors' onto the beginning of its own.

A skeleton starting point:

class Element
{
public:
    Element()
    : m_pParent( 0 )
    {
    }


private:

    std::string m_Name;
    std::string m_Contents;

    Element* m_pParent;
    std::list<Element*> m_Children;

};
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