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In the code below I can use print in place of console.log and the program can run correctly. However I wish to use console.log but I get

Illegal invocation

at runtime

function forEach(array, action) {
    for (var i=0; i<array.length; i++) 
        action(array[i]);
}

forEach(["blah", "bac"], console.log);
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In general you can't pass methods directly to callbacks in Javascript. The this is bound at the point of the function call, depending on what form you call it and there is no automatic binding of methods (like there is in, for example, Python)

//does not work.
var obj = {
    x: 17,
    f: function(){ return this.x; }
};

//inside doSomething, f forgets its "this" should be obj
doSomething( obj.f )

In these cases, one might use Function.prototype.bind (or a similar function from your library of choice, since bind is not present in older browsers)

//works (for normal methods - see next bit for console.log in particular)
var obj = {
    x: 17,
    f: function(){ return this.x; }
};

doSomething( obj.f.bind(obj) )

Unfortunately, however, this is not always enough for console.log. Since it is not an actual Function in IE, (its an evil host object) you cannot use bind, apply and call methods on it on that browser so the only workaround is falling back to wrapping the call in an anonymous function

doSomething( function(x){
    return console.log(x);
});

Since wrapping console.log in an anonymous function is long and annoying to type I usually add the following global function when I'm developing and debugging:

function log(message){ return function(x){
    return console.log(message, x);
};};

forEach(['asd', 'zxc'], log('->'));
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You can solve the problem using an anonymous function acting as a bridge between forEach() and console.log()

forEach(["blah", "bac"], function (element) {
    console.log(element);
});

Your forEach() remains agnostic about the handler and you don't have to juggle with bind() to pass a working reference to console.log().

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From here : Create shortcut to console.log()

You can replace console.log with console.log.bind(console)

Explanation thanks to @julian-d :

Because the console.log will refer internally to this and expects it to be console. If you 'detach' the log method e.g. like var log = console.log, this association is lost and this will no longer point to console (in this case to window instead - if you are in a browser). This is the purpose of .bind(obj): it returns a method where internally this stays fixed to obj.

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but why can't you do log = console.log then ? –  meze Jan 29 '12 at 10:20
2  
@meze: because the console.log will refer internally to this and expects it to be console. If you 'detach' the log method e.g. like var log = console.log, this association is lost and this will no longer point to console (in this case to window instead - if you are in a browser). This is the purpose of .bind(obj): it returns a method where internally this stays fixed to obj. –  Julian D. Jan 29 '12 at 11:24
    
Remember that bind isn't available in all browsers. See the answer from @frm for a solution that doesn't require bind. –  James McLaughlin Jan 29 '12 at 15:50
1  
This doesnt not work on IE (the old ones at least) - console.log isn't a Function so it lacks bbind call and apply –  hugomg Jan 29 '12 at 15:53

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