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Often I find myself in a situation where I have to deal with catching some exceptions thrown by implementers of an interface. This ususally gets problematic when the different implementations deal with completely different types of devices etc: depending on the implementation the amount and types of exceptions thrown vary greatly. Here's a typical example:

interface DataStream
{
  Data ReadNext();
}

class DeserializingFileDataStream : DataStream
{
  //this one does file operations + serialization,
  //so can throw eg IOException, SerializationException, InvalidOperationException, ...
}

class NetworkDataStream : DataStream
{
  //get data over tcp
  //so throws IOException, SocketException
}

class HardwareDeviceDataStream : DataStream
{
  //read from a custom hardware device implemented in unmanaged code
  //so throws mainly custom exceptions
}

Likely all these also throw ArgumentExceptions and so forth, but I'm not interested in catching those: in this case they would indicate programming errors. However I do not want the program to crash when a file is corrupted, a network cable is unplugged or the custom device goes berserk, so the other exceptions should be dealt with.

I already tried a couple of solutions but none of them I am particularly happy with, so the question is: is there some common practice/pattern to handle situations like these? Please be concrete and do not tell me to 'look at ELMAH'. Here's some things I used in the past:

  • catch( Exception ) well, it's obvious what the problems are
  • TryAndCatchDataStream( Action what, Action<Exception> errHandler ) method consisting of a try followed by a catch for any exception of interest from any implementation. Meaning it has to be updated when implementations change or are added/removed.
  • put a comment on the interface saying 'should only throw DataStreamExceptions' and in all implementations make sure this rule is followed by catching anything of interest and wrapping it in a DataStreamException, then throwing that. Not too bad, but adds noise to every implementation.

Then I have a second more general question about exception handling (don't think it's needed to make a seperate post for this): I have some cases where method A calls B which calls C which calls D, and D throws a SomeException yet the caller of A catches the exception. Isn't this a sign there is something wrong with the code? Because to be able to do this, the caller of A needs to know A will eventually call D. Unless A documents it can throw a SomeException; but in both cases it means that when updating a mere implementation detail of A (ie make it call something else than D), this change is visible to the users of A.

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I would choose the third option. And for your second question, I don't think it's a problem as long as it's commented it can throw that exception. How it can be thrown? Encapsulation! –  gdoron Jan 29 '12 at 10:18
1  
It's irrelevant, since you should only ever catch exceptions that you know how to handle. If you don't even know what the exception is, then you obviously can't handle it. –  Cody Gray Jan 29 '12 at 10:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no way to "know" what an unknown exception might be. All you can do is catch the exceptions you know about, and perhaps log the ones you don't and rethrow them.

You could catch Exception, then call a method in a seperate assembly that determines what to do with the excpetion. Then you could update the assembly as needed without having to update the rest of the code.

Regarding your second question, A needs to document any exception that can bubble up from it, that includes exceptions thrown by dependant objects. B needs to document the exceptions it throws, so A can know about them, etc.. etc..

If you change A to do something that causes a change in the exceptions thrown, then you have to change the documentation. From the calling applications perspective, all it knows about is A. A can be doing anything, and the calling app doesn't care if it's a B, C or D. A is responsible for whatever gets bubbled up to the caller.

Think of it like this. Suppose you hired a construction company to build you a house. They, in turn, hire sub-contractors. Those Sub-Contracots might hire their own labor. If the bottom level laborors screw up, ultimate the contractor you hired is at fault, regardless of whether it was some other company that hired them. You don't care, you just want your house built to specifications, adn the construction company is respoonsible for that.

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+1 good analogy. However this made me think of something else: combining my two questions, so A calls B, C, D and D is the interface method throwing whatever. I guess in sich cases C should take care of trying to hanlde as much of possible of what D throws? –  stijn Jan 29 '12 at 10:47
2  
@stijn - Not all exceptions are intended to be handled. At least not at low levels. If the top level caller wants a file, and the file doesn't exist, then that has to get passed up. It's only implementation specific exceptions that should be handled. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 29 '12 at 11:05
    
@MystereMan: If a caller wants to read a document from a file, and an ArgumentRangeException occurs while deserializing part of it, by what means should the exception be handled such that the caller knows that abandoning the partially-loaded document will put everything right? Is there any way to avoid massively bloating the code at all levels of the application or having to use Poke'mon exception handling? –  supercat Jan 31 '12 at 22:31

You can use an abstract class instead of an interface to wrap in your base class the exceptions from the various implementations to be able to wrap the underlying exceptions in a common way. This way you have one central point to alter your exception wrapping and analysing logic. Some exceptions might be severe which still should lead to termination of your process like OutOfMemoryExcepptions where it is most likely not safe to continue anymore.

In case you do insist on an interface you should wait until some future CLR version where interfaces can have a base implementation. There is a video of Vance Morrison talking about such a feature but I have never heard of it again.

If you cannot wait for the CLR vNext you have as other option to create a wrapper class (lets call it DataStreamReader) which takes an IDataStream interface that implements IDataStream as well but does the wrapping as you desire. If you take care that in your code where you read only use DataStreamReader instances you should be fine.

The design forces any inheriter to implement the ReadNextImpl method where your consumers do implment their logic. You do call as before ReadNext and get with the current simple implementation always a DataStreamException back. That is the most simple solution I could come up with.

   class Data { }
    public class DataStreamException : Exception
    {
        public DataStreamException(string message, Exception inner)
            : base(message, inner)
        {   }
    }

    abstract class DataStream
    {
        protected abstract Data ReadNextImpl();
        public Data ReadNext()
        {
            try
            {
                return ReadNextImpl();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new DataStreamException("Could not read from stream. See inner exception for details.", ex);
            }
        }
    }

    class DeserializingFileDataStream : DataStream
    {
        protected override Data ReadNextImpl()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

    }

    class NetworkDataStream : DataStream
    {
        protected override Data ReadNextImpl()
        {
            throw new Exception();
        }
    }
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Fundamentally, code which catches an exception needs to know a number of things:

  1. What happened?
  2. Does the condition require any particular action
  3. Once the above action, if any, is performed, should the exceptional condition be considered resolved.
  4. What state will any applicable objects be in?

Unfortunately, many languages and frameworks including C++, Java, and .net, try to use one rather clunky kind of information (the type of the thrown exception object) to convey all three pieces of information, even though in practice they're often largely orthogonal. A particularly noteworthy difficulty of such a design is that it's possible for multiple exceptional conditions to arise simultaneously, such that handlers applicable to ANY of them should run, but the exception should continue up the stack until handlers applicable to ALL of them have run.

Despite the limitations of the type-based design, though, one has to work with it. In designing one's own new classes/interfaces and the exceptions that leak from them, one should try to use different exception types to answer question #3-#4 above, since those are the questions most likely to be of interest to a caller. I would further suggest that it may be desirable for classes to have a state-variable or flag which can be invalidated if an exception thrown from within a method is likely to have left the class in an invalid state, perhaps using a pattern something like:

  ... before doing anything that might cause object to enter invalid state even temporarily ...
  if (state != MyClassState.HappyIdle) throw new StateCorruptException(....);
  state = MyClassState.UnhappyOrBusy;
  ... manipulate state in a fashion that will end up with a valid state when complete ...
  state = MyClassState.HappyIdle;

If such a pattern is used consistently, callers won't have to worry too much about the possibility that an operation which resulted in an exception might have left an object in a corrupt state such that attempting continued operation could cause further data loss. If the object got corrupted but calling code ignored the exception that occurred when that happened, further attempts to use the object will fail cleanly.

Unfortunately, many classes are not very well protected using such guards, so it may not be safe to assume that unknown exceptions are "harmless". On the other hand, from a practical perspective, there isn't any approach which is both robust and safe. Either run the risk of having one's code die needlessly for an exception that would, in fact, have been harmless, or else run the risk of corrupt data structures spiralling out of control and corrupting other data structures. In a better-designed exception system, there would be better alternatives, but not with the system that exists.

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You could implement your own custom exception. Have each implementation if the interfaces catch their own exceptions and throw your custom exception while setting the real exception to the inner. That might be ok depending on your case.

Since exceptions should be exceptional. This way you would at least know if you are catching exceptions that the implementation knew to watch for.

Not really sure if this is a good idea or not. Just thought I would offer the idea.

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well this is basically the thrid solution I mentioned :] –  stijn Jan 29 '12 at 10:48
    
Ahh so it is :) –  latr0dectus Jan 29 '12 at 10:49

Java forces you to declare which exceptions you throw, and it's a real nasty pain with very little benefits - usually because exceptions are thrown under exceptional circumstances, and it's hard to plan those ahead.

What Java programmers often end up doing (after being taught not to use throws Exception) is your third option. This third option makes sense for exceptions you don't expect your calling code to know how to handle - if you want the calling code to handle them (say, repeat three times in case of an IOException or NetworkException), you'd better stick to what people already know.

So in short, I recommend you catch the exceptions you know how to handle in your calling code, and just report those you can't handle and exit (or fail the operation).

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