Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does TestNG continue to execute the test if one TestCase (Class) has failed?

For example the testoutput is:

1 test passed, 1 test failed.(3599,0 s)
    TestSuite FAILED
        run FAILED: check5=3 Expected: <3> got: <5>
        run passed (1.0s)    // <--- this should not have been executed

why is the second run even executed? my testngsuite.xml:

<suite name="TestSuite_03">
    <test name="TestCase_17">
        <groups>
            <run><include name="functest"/></run>
        </groups>
        <classes>
            <class name="TestStep_003" desc="will fail" />
            <class name="TestStep_012" desc="will pass" />
        </classes> ...

I am using Maven, TestNG and Java via NetBeans

my structure:

public abstract class TestCommon
{
    @BeforeSuite(groups={"functest})
    public void BeforeSuite()
    {
        // clean report folder
    }
    @BeforeTest(groups={"functest})
    public void BeforeTest()
    {
        // start selenium browser
    }
    @AfterMethod(groups={"functest})
    public void AfterMethod()
    {
        // check for failure and capture screenshot
    }
    @AfterTest(groups={"functest})
    public void AfterTest()
    {
        // close browser
    }
}


public class TestStep_003 extends TestCommon
{
    @Test(groups = {functest})
    public void run()
    {
        assertThat(5, Matchers.equalTo(3)); // will fail
    }
}
public class TestStep_012 extends TestCommon
{
    @Test(groups = {functest})
    public void run()
    {
        assertThat(5, Matchers.equalTo(5)); // will pass
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Why wouldn't it? –  Dave Newton Jan 29 '12 at 13:36
    
because i would assume if one testclass has failed, that the test environment is corrupt and further testing should be stopped, not the suite, but at least the current test. –  CreeTar Jan 29 '12 at 13:50
    
Oh. I wouldn't assume that, nor does any test runner I'm aware of, unless you explicitly tell the runner to stop at the first error. Seems like you'd want to do that only for specific suites, though, since it's completely legitimate for a single test to fail because, say, a change broke a test. –  Dave Newton Jan 29 '12 at 13:54
    
aww, alright. so my test is like test1 open url, test2 enter data into a form... if test1 failed, no need for test2. how can i stop than testing the current test without stopping the whole suite? –  CreeTar Jan 29 '12 at 14:00
    
Does TestNG even guarantee that all testcases are run sequentially and in the "right" order? That does seem quite the stretch to me, but since I design my testcases to make them independent of each other I haven't really looked that up. –  Voo Jan 29 '12 at 14:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should design your test cases to be independent, because modularity decreases complexity: If tests are dependent, you would always need to run all test cases if the last one failed, and needed to check all test cases whether they might have caused the error/failure.

With independent tests, you can run all of them, e.g. during a nightly build, even if some of them fail. Or execute a specific one in isolation. And you need not worry about the ordering of tests. That is why almost all test runners execute all tests and make no guarantee about their order.

This applies especially for unit tests. For a few integration tests and acceptance tests some dependency might be acceptable. In that case, use TestNG's dependency feature.

share|improve this answer
    
would you mind checking on this question i had too, its a bit more weird i guess :D stackoverflow.com/questions/9053310/… –  CreeTar Jan 29 '12 at 14:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.