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I am porting a library that manipulates raw byte data in the form of a .vxl file from C to Java. In C a function is passed a "unsigned char *". What type would be best to use in Java? (Byte[]?)

Also, why does the C code access the "unsigned char *" as an array at places although it isn't defined as it?

Code:

    MapData * load_vxl(unsigned char * v)
    {
       MapData * map = new MapData;
       if (v == NULL)
        return map;
       int x,y,z;
       for (y=0; y < 512; ++y) {
          for (x=0; x < 512; ++x) {
             for (z=0; z < 64; ++z) {
                map->geometry[get_pos(x, y, z)] = 1;
             }
             z = 0;
             for(;;) {
                int *color;
                int i;
                int number_4byte_chunks = v[0];
                int top_color_start = v[1];
                int top_color_end   = v[2]; // inclusive
                int bottom_color_start;
                int bottom_color_end; // exclusive
                int len_top;
                int len_bottom;
                for(i=z; i < top_color_start; i++)
                   map->geometry[get_pos(x, y, i)] = 0;
                color = (int *) (v+4);
                for(z=top_color_start; z <= top_color_end; z++)
                   map->colors[get_pos(x, y, z)] = *color++;
                len_bottom = top_color_end - top_color_start + 1;

                // check for end of data marker
                if (number_4byte_chunks == 0) {
                   // infer ACTUAL number of 4-byte chunks from the length of the color data
                   v += 4 * (len_bottom + 1);
                   break;
                }

                // infer the number of bottom colors in next span from chunk length
                len_top = (number_4byte_chunks-1) - len_bottom;

                // now skip the v pointer past the data to the beginning of the next span
                v += v[0]*4;

                bottom_color_end   = v[3]; // aka air start
                bottom_color_start = bottom_color_end - len_top;
                for(z=bottom_color_start; z < bottom_color_end; ++z) {
                   map->colors[get_pos(x, y, z)] = *color++;
                }
             }
          }
       }
       return map;
    }
share|improve this question

In C, arrays decay into pointers, and pointers can reference either a single item, or a contiguous set of items. They are highly interchangeable but not the same. Let's just say its extremely easy to swap between the two.

As to the first part of your question, Java does not have unsigned primitives, so you will have to convert the code by using widening, aka using a larger data type. In this instance you would want to convert the code to use an array of ints.

share|improve this answer

from your question:

color = (int *) (v+4);

As v is an char*, incrementing for positions, will go 32 bits ahead, that is exactly the size of an int in a 32 bits machine. So, it is incrementing one "int" position, and reading as an integer.

in Java code:

being int v[] = new int[COLORS_QTD] your array.

the v+4 means that you want the forth position in this array. it is simple:

color = v[4]
share|improve this answer
2  
The cast to int* happens after incrementing the pointer by 4. So it increments char* by 4, which on 32 bit systems is int* +1. – josefx Jan 29 '12 at 14:03
    
Sorry, it is true, now I realized that the v is a char* , not a int *. – Pih Jan 29 '12 at 15:56
  1. yes, it could be expressed as a byte array (not array of Bytes).
  2. The a[index] syntax in C is nothing else than a pointer calculation of the form a + pointer_size * index.
share|improve this answer
    
In that case, how could I do the "color = (int *) (v+4);" statement in Java? – HansiHE Jan 29 '12 at 13:47
    
The statement interprets the bytes starting at v+4 as an int. You can replicate that with bitwise shift and or. However, I'd strongly advise to learn a bit of C to actually understand the code. – Femaref Jan 29 '12 at 13:49

I am porting a library that manipulates raw byte data in the form of a .vxl file from C to Java. In C a function is passed a "unsigned char *". What type would be best to use in Java? (Byte[]?)

You should take a byte[], don't use Byte[] as it stores objects and has a large overhead. In the method Itself you can use a ByteBuffer to wrap the array, it provides several methods to access the data stored in a byte array.

Also, why does the C code access the "unsigned char *" as an array at places although it isn't defined as it?

In C accessing an array and a pointer work the same way. The char* pointer can point to a single or multiple successive chars (an array), the compiler accesses each element by computing pointer+index

share|improve this answer

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