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In .hpp file I have

template <SomeEnum E>
class SomeClass {
   //many definitions
   class InnerClass {
       //Some stuff
   };
   typedef std::map<std::string, InnerClass> InnerMapType;
};

in .cpp files I have

template <SomeEnum E>
SomeClass<E>::~SomeClass() {
   InnerMapType::iterator iter;
   //Iterate over resources
}

Compiler gives syntax error in InnerMap::iterator iter; claiming semicolon is expected before iter. If I remove the template <SomeEnum E> part compiler is happy. What did I forget and how do I make it work?

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What prevented you from indenting your code? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 29 '12 at 14:32
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit, since the preview did not show syntax highlighting I hoped that syntax and indentation will appear automagically once I post it. Thank you. –  Muxecoid Jan 29 '12 at 14:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Take a look into dependent names.

To solve your issue, you need to use typename :

template <SomeEnum E>
SomeClass<E>::~SomeClass() {
   typename InnerMapType::iterator iter;
   //Iterate over resources
}
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Thanks, this helped. Trivia question: Do you know why compiler says "missing semicolon" instead of giving a human-readable error message? –  Muxecoid Jan 29 '12 at 14:34
1  
Depends on how good the compiler is. Comeau will say "error: nontype InnerMapType::iterator is not a type name" –  James Hopkin Jan 29 '12 at 14:46
    
the later compiler versions tend to be better with template errors. Yes, that error message is not very helpful, except for the line number –  BЈовић Jan 29 '12 at 14:59
1  
@Muxecoid: If you don't specify what exactly the nested name is (typename for types, template for templates), it will assume that it's a variable or function (and subsequently that iter is one too). However, since whitespace isn't overloadable, it will error like always when two names are directly beneath each other and the first one isn't a type. It expects you to write InnerMapType::iterator; iter;, however nonsensical that is to us. :) –  Xeo Jan 29 '12 at 15:26

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