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I am just starting Ruby and learning the concept of modules. I understand that one use of modules is to better organize your code and avoid name clashes. Let's say I have bunch of modules like this (I haven't included the implementation as that's not important) :

module Dropbox

  class Base

    def initialize(a_user)
    end

  end  

  class Event < Base

    def newFile?
    end

    def newImage?
    end

  end

  class Action < Base

    def saveFile(params)
    end

  end

end

and another module:

module CustomURL

  class Base

    def initialize(a_user, a_url, a_method, some_args, a_regex)
    end

  end

  class Event < Base

    def initialize(a_user, a_url, a_method, some_args, a_regex)
    end

    def change?
    end

  end

  class Action < Base

    def send_request(params)
    end

  end

end

I am going to have a bunch of these modules (10+, for gmail, hotmail, etc...). What I am trying to figure out is, is this the right way to organize my code?

Basically, I am using module to represent a "service" and all services will have a common interface class (base for initializing, action for list of actions and event for monitoring).

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1  
I recommend that this be moved to codereview.stackexchange.com. Your code works, it just isn't as tight as it could be. –  the Tin Man Jan 29 '12 at 16:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are defining families of related or dependent classes here. Your usage of modules as namespaces for these families is correct.

Also with this approach it would be easy to build abstract factory for your classes if they had compatible interface. But as far as I see this is not the case for current classes design: for example Dropbox::Event and CustomURL::Event have completely different public methods.

You can reevaluate design of your classes and see if it is possible for them to have uniform interface so that you can use polymorphism and extract something like BaseEvent and BaseAction so that all Events and Actions will derive from these base classes.

Update: As far as you define services, it might be useful to define top-level module like Service and put all your classes inside this module. It will improve modularity of your system. If in the future you would refactor out some base classes for your modules services, you can put them in the top-level namespace. Then your objects will have readable names like these:

Service::Dropbox::Event
Service::Dropbox::Action
Service::CustomURL::Event
Service::CustomURL::Action
Service::BaseEvent
Service::BaseAction
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Thanks for the input. In regards to what you wrote in "update", do you mean put a module inside a module? (sorry if this is a novice question, new to ruby...) –  0xSina Jan 29 '12 at 16:22
    
@PragmaOnce, yes, you can put modules inside module –  Alex Kliuchnikau Jan 29 '12 at 16:27
    
Is there an easy way to put the modules inside a module rather than manually having 10+ modules in the same file? –  0xSina Jan 29 '12 at 16:55
    
@PragmaOnce, You can define module in one file module Service; end and then put class inside this module with the following short syntax: class Service::ClassName. This class may be defined in other file because Modules can be reopened (as well as classes, btw ruby classes are modules because Class class inherit Module class). –  Alex Kliuchnikau Jan 29 '12 at 17:08

I have some similar code at work, only I'm modeling networking gear.

I took the approach of defining a generic class with the common attributes and methods, including a generic comparator, and then sub-class that for the various models of hardware. The sub-classes contain the unique attributes for that hardware, plus all the support code necessary to initialize or compare an instance of that equipment with another.

As soon as I see the need to write a method similar to another I wrote I think about how I can reuse that code by promoting it to the base-class. Often this involves changing how I am passing parameters, and instead of using formal parameters, I end up using a hash, then pulling what I need from it, keeping the method interface under control.

Because you would have a lot of sub-classes to a base class, it's important to take your time and think out how that base-class should work. As you add sub-classes the task of refactoring the base will get harder because you will have to change other sub-classes. I always find I go down some blind-alleys and have to back up a bit, but as the class matures that should happen less and less.

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Thanks for the input. Using hash as parameters, is this a common practise in ruby code? also is there any performance issues with hat? –  0xSina Jan 29 '12 at 19:28
    
It is very common. You'll find Ruby works really well with name/value pairs passes as options, which get converted into a hash on the receiving side. Any decent Ruby book will discuss that in the section about methods. –  the Tin Man Jan 30 '12 at 1:15

As you will notice soon, there is no 'right way' of organizing code.

There are subtle differences in readability that are mostly subjective. The way you are organizing classes is just fine for releasing your code as a gem. It usually isn't needed in code that won't be included in other peoples projects, but it won't hurt either.

Just ask yourself "does this make sense for someone reading my code who has no idea what my intention is?".

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3  
"there is no 'right way' of organizing code", correct, but there are "more right" ways of doing it. Following "DRY" ("Don't Repeat Yourself" ) tends to push us certain directions, such as working with a base class then sub-classing it. Will the OPs code work as is? Probably. Could it be better? Yes. –  the Tin Man Jan 29 '12 at 16:56

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