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I want to make a function called debug that outputs some info about objects. My system contains objects of many different types; some of them contain other objects.

using namespace std; // for brevity
struct dog {string name;};
struct human {string name; string address;};
struct line {list<human*> contents;};
struct pack {vector<dog*> contents;};

I want the function to output the member name of the argument if it has one, or debug the contents member of the argument if it has one. I came up with the following code:

template <class T>
void debug(T object) // T here is a simple object like dog, human, etc
{
    cout << object.name.c_str() << '\n';
}

// A helper function, not really important
template <class T>
void debug_pointer(T* object)
{
    debug(*object);
}

void debug(pack object)
{
    for_each(object.contents.begin(), object.contents.end(), debug_pointer<dog>);
}

void debug(line object)
{
    for_each(object.contents.begin(), object.contents.end(), debug_pointer<human>);
}

Here, the code for pack and line is nearly identical! I would like to avoid writing the same code several times:

struct line {list<human*> contents; typedef human type;};
struct pack {vector<dog*> contents; typedef dog type;};

template <class T>
void debug(T object) // T here is a compound object (having contents)
{
    for_each(object.contents.begin(), object.contents.end(), debug_pointer<T::type>);
}

But this syntax conflicts with the function template for the "simple" objects (has the same signature).

How can i rewrite my code? I don't want to rewrite the first part (declarations for dog, human, etc) because that part of my program is already very complicated, and adding stuff (base classes, member functions, etc) to it just for debugging seems out of place.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The basic code could look like this:

template <typename T> void debug(T const & x)
{
    debug_helper<T, has_name<T>::value>::print(x);
}

We need a helper class:

template <typename, bool> struct debug_helper;

template <typename T> struct debug_helper<T, true>
{
    static void print(T const & x) { /* print x.name */ }
};
template <typename T> struct debug_helper<T, false>
{
    static void print(T const & x) { /* print x.content */ }
};

Now we just need a SFINAE trait class has_name<T>, and a mechanism to print containers. Both those problems are solved almost verbatim in the pretty printer code.

share|improve this answer

Make the container a template parameter as well:

template <template <typename> class Container, typename T>
void debug(Container<T> object)
{
    for_each(object.contents.begin(), object.contents.end(), debug_pointer<T>);
}

BTW, most of the cases you may want to pass by const reference instead of by value (which requires copying the whole vector/list):

template <template <typename> class Container, typename T>
void debug(const Container<T>& object)

If C++11 can be used, you could use decltype to determine the T from the contents:

template <typename T>
void debug(const T& object)
{
    typedef decltype(*object.contents.front()) T;
    for_each(object.contents.begin(), object.contents.end(), debug_pointer<T>);
}

GCC also has typeof when C++11 cannot be used.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, my "simple" classes are templated as well. I want to choose the version of debug to use by the presence of the member contents, not by the "templatedness" of the parameter (also edited my question). – anatolyg Jan 29 '12 at 15:59
    
@anatolyg: You either need to typedef human type has you did, or use decltype/typeof. – kennytm Jan 29 '12 at 16:04

Using C++11, decltype and SFINAE make things easy :)

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

struct dog { std::string name; };
struct human { std::string name; std::string address; };
struct line { std::list<human*> contents; };
struct pack { std::vector<dog*> contents; };

template <typename T>
auto debug(T const& t) -> decltype(t.name, void(0)) {
  std::cout << t.name << '\n';
}

template <typename T>
auto debug(T const* t) -> decltype(t->name, void(0)) {
  if (t != 0) std::cout << t->name << '\n';
}

struct Debugger {
  template <typename T>
  void operator()(T const& t) { debug(t); }
};

template <typename C>
auto debug(C const& c) -> decltype(c.contents, void(0)) {
  typedef decltype(c.contents) contents_type;
  typedef typename contents_type::value_type type;
  std::for_each(c.contents.begin(), c.contents.end(), Debugger());
}


int main() {
  dog dog1 = { "dog1" }, dog2 = { "dog2" };
  human h1 = { "h1" }, h2 = { "h2" };

  line l; l.contents.push_back(&h1); l.contents.push_back(&h2);

  debug(l);

}

In action at ideone this yields:

h1
h2

as expected :)

Without C++11, it requires some little craft but the principle remains the same, using boost::enable_if you need to create a structure that will provoke a compilation error based on the presence and accessibility of name and contents.

Of course, it would all easier if you simply hooked up the methods in the structures themselves :)

share|improve this answer

You can use SFINAE to select the overload being used.

I forget the exact details, but you can use it to detect the presence of a "contents" member or a "name" member and then overload based on that.

share|improve this answer

First off i want to say use the IDE/debugger when possible (especially the call stack) or a language with reflection. However since your stuck with C++ you can use typeid(T).name/raw_name which will give you the name of the type. Or hashcode if you want that for any reason.

In one project i did all my classes were structs and i had >100 of them. I just wrote them in C#, use reflection to generate C++ code and all the serialization and debug code i needed was there.

The code in your example is not clear. I don't know why you're having problems with templated function with names the same as "simple" objects. I did it below. Heres working code.

#include <typeinfo>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class A{
public:
    typedef A Type;
};

void debug(int) {
    cout<<typeid(int).name() <<endl;
}
void debug(const char*) {
    cout<<typeid(const char*).name() <<endl;
}
template<class T>
void debug(T t) {
    cout<<typeid(T).name() <<endl;
}
template<class T>
void debug() {
    cout<<typeid(T).name() <<endl;
}
int main(){
    debug(1);
    debug("");
    debug(A());
    debug<A::Type>(); //extra for fun
}
share|improve this answer
    
He wants the name member, not the name of the type. – Mooing Duck Feb 14 '12 at 21:29
    
@MooingDuck thats impossible in C++ but this is more to show templated functions not giving a compile error with regular functions – acidzombie24 Feb 14 '12 at 21:36
    
Impossible? Did you overlook that Matthieu M. did it, and has a link to a site that shows that it compiles, runs, and works? :D – Mooing Duck Feb 14 '12 at 21:39
    
I misunderstand what you meant. I thought you were saying the name of the member rather than the string of the variable 'name'. Also since templates functions work here (what op was claiming wouldn't compile) without using C++11, i thought it be useful. I cant imagine he wouldnt know how to print the name member using this code -edit- also Matthieu didnt address templated functions with the same name as normal function what op question is asking... – acidzombie24 Feb 14 '12 at 21:49

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