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I have a question about java multithreading.

I have a class which has access to multiple threads.

Class A 
{
    private Object obj;

    public Object returnObject()
    {
       if(condition)
          return getObjectA();
       else
          return getObjectB();
    }

    public Object getObjectA()
    {
       obj = new Object()
       obj.setProperty("prp1");
    }

    public Object getObjectB()
    {
       obj = new Object()
       obj.setProperty("prp2");
    }
}

Now when there are multiple threads accessing getObj..() would it create problems with "obj" state. Would there be any undesired results?

Thanx SLaks and Peter,

I think following will also solve thread safety concerns :

public Object getObjectA()
{
  Object obj = new Object()
  obj.setProperty("prp1");  
  return obj;                                                                                   
}
share|improve this question
    
@skaffman I assumed it was a placeholder for an actual, meaningful condition –  Bohemian Jan 29 '12 at 16:06
    
@Bohemian you are correct –  Pankaj Chaswal Jan 29 '12 at 16:11
    
When you use a field or variable, it is usually best to limit the scope to only where it is needed. In this case it may actually solve you problem. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 29 '12 at 20:32

6 Answers 6

Yes.

If two threads call different code paths in returnObject() simultaneously, it could run getObjectB() between the two statements in getObjectA() and end up calling obj.setProperty("prp1"); on ObjectB.

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Ahh thanx SLaks. –  Pankaj Chaswal Jan 29 '12 at 16:01

Yes, it will create problems (try the code to see what kind of problems, but data will be lost). The simplest solution is to use a synchronized block.

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Hi Peter, How about if i go for public Object getObjectA() { Object obj = new Object() obj.setProperty("prp1"); return obj; } –  Pankaj Chaswal Jan 29 '12 at 16:06
    
That should be fine. –  Peter V Jan 29 '12 at 16:53

Provided, the if(true) is not hard coded since this will fix the execution path where getObjA() is always invoked !

Yes, this code can run into race condition where the obj's value can depend on the order of thread execution (ie which order the getObj..() is invoked by multiple threads).

You need to synchronize the access to the obj variable.

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I think that getObjectA() and getObjectB() should be declared as private, and the then you should use a synchronized block inside the returnObject() method, so something like this :

class A 
{

private Object obj;

public Object returnObject()
{

   Object result;
   synchronized (A.class) { 
   result = (true) ? getObjectA() : getObjectB();
   }
  return result;
}

private Object getObjectA()
{
   obj = new Object()
   obj.setProperty("prp1");
}

private Object getObjectB()
{
   obj = new Object()
   obj.setProperty("prp2");
}

} 

Obviously the true condition must be replaced with some condition ...

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I would suggest to change to code to NOT holds the 'obj' as a data member as it is need to ve concurrently accessed. There are several solutions: 1. Create the Object locally inside the functions 2. Use a ThreadLocal object that can "wraps" the 'obj' data member 3. Create the Object once and user clone() for every call locally to a local Object and edit it.

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Yes, but this is pretty simple to fix, since you are replacing obj every call, you clearly don't care about it, so try making the field obj just a local variable, like this:

Class A {
    public Object returnObject() {
       if (true)
           return getObjectA();
       return getObjectB();
    }

    public Object getObjectA() {
       Object obj = new Object()
       obj.setProperty("prp1");
       return obj;
    }

    public Object getObjectB() {
       Object obj = new Object()
       obj.setProperty("prp2");
       return obj;
    }
}

If this works for you, consider making these methods static.

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