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Can some one explain this statement. I think this code is written in C and I am trying to convert it in python. Please bare with me as I am new to python and programming.

class hello(object):

      def abc(self):
           d =[0] * 2048
           d = [2048/8] |= 0x01 << 2048%8 # how type this in python
            return d

Thank you See comments

k = 2
m = 256*8
 //the filter
  byte[m/8] bloom   
  function insertIP(byte[] ip) {
byte[20] hash = sha1(ip)
int index1 = hash[0] | hash[1] << 8
int index2 = hash[2] | hash[3] << 8
// truncate index to m (11 bits required)
index1 %= m  
index2 %= m  

// set bits at index1 and index2
bloom[index1 / 8] |= 0x01 << index1 % 8   ## how this would be written in python
bloom[index2 / 8] |= 0x01 << index2 % 8   ## ??
 }

// insert IP 192.168.1.1 into the filter:
 insertIP(byte[4] {192,168,1,1})
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closed as not constructive by Paul Sasik, Book Of Zeus, Robert Harvey Jan 29 '12 at 18:20

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
If you have C code to transliterate, then please show the C code, not some invalid pseudo-Python. – Fred Foo Jan 29 '12 at 16:11
    
here is the code please bare as i am student //k = 2 m = 256*8 //the filter byte[m/8] bloom ## What is this part? function insertIP(byte[] ip) { byte[20] hash = sha1(ip) int index1 = hash[0] | hash[1] << 8 int index2 = hash[2] | hash[3] << 8 // truncate index to m (11 bits required) index1 %= m ## ? index2 %= m ## ? // set bits at index1 and index2 bloom[index1 / 8] |= 0x01 << index1 % 8 ## ?? bloom[index2 / 8] |= 0x01 << index2 % 8 ## ?? } // insert IP 192.168.1.1 into the filter insertIP(byte[4] {192,168,1,1}) – Shazib Jan 29 '12 at 16:13
1  
@Shazib: Please edit and put that into the post. – kennytm Jan 29 '12 at 16:16
1  
@Shazib : Please don't paste your code into comments like that. Edit your question to include more information and please take care to format. – Paul Sasik Jan 29 '12 at 16:16
    
OK. -1 and voting to close. This question was asked yesterday and with higher quality at that point. The original code actually looks like JavaScript and not C or C#. @Shazib : Please take care with posts. THIS IS NOT good SO behavior! – Paul Sasik Jan 29 '12 at 16:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't understand what you're trying to do. Are you trying to assign a value to an item in d? If so, it would be this:

d =[0] * 2048
d[2048/8] |= 0x01 << 2048 % 8

But be aware that 2048 % 8 == 0.

It sounds like what you're really asking for is an explanation of bitwise operations. In python, the usual boolean operators, and and or, test the entire value of a variable for truth. Bitwise operators, instead, operate on the individual bits of the value. They only work on number-like values. Understanding them requires you to understand how numbers are stored in computer memory -- in binary. If you don't know the basics about binary number systems, read about them and come back.

Ok, now an example. In binary, 5 looks like this:

101

This represents five because 2 ^ 0 * 1 + 2 ^ 1 * 0 + 2 ^ 2 * 1 == 5. In binary, 2 looks like this:

10

For the purpose of the | operator (the bitwise or operator), we can assume that digits to the left of the leftmost digit are all 0. Let's place the numbers side by side, adding a zero to the second number to make the columns line up correctly:

5:     101
2:     010

When we do a bitwise or, we take each column, perform an or operation on the two values, and store the result in a new column, like so:

5:     101
2:     010
5 | 2: 111

Because there's at least 1 1 in each column, and 1 or 0 == 1 the result has 3 1s. A few more examples:

6:     110
2:     010
6 | 2: 110

Here, one column has no 1s, so the final result has a 0 in that column.

There's also a bitwise and operator, &, which does the same thing, but uses and instead of or:

5:     101
2:     010
5 & 2: 000

6:     110
2:     010
6 & 2: 010

These operators can be used to access individual bits in memory. That's what the above code is doing.

There's another kind of binary operator: the binary shift operator. Binary shift operators look like this a << b or this a >> b. They say, very simply, shift the bits of a by b bits. For example, in binary, 5 << 1 looks like this:

5:        101
5 << 1:  1010
5 << 2: 10100

And 5 >> 1 looks like this:

5 >> 1:    10
5 >> 2:     1
5 >> 3:     0

The last shift eliminates the last 1; as explained above, there's an implicit 0 to the left of the 1 in these examples, and that's what's left after 3 shifts.

So, to sum it all up, this is what the code is doing. It's shifting 1 to the left by some number of bits, and then performing an or operation, thereby "writing" that bit to the given column.

1:            0001
1 << 3:       1000
5:            0101
5 | (1 << 3): 1101

The |= is simply in-place operation. So type a = 5; then a += 2; now a == 7. And likewise a = 5; a |= (1 << 3); now a == 13.

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