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Is there a method to stop lapply() from returning NULL values for each element of the list when a function doesn't have a return().

Here's a pretty basic example:

x <- function(x) {
return(NULL) }

a.list <- list(a=1,b=2,c=3)

lapply(a.list, x)

The output is:

$a
NULL

$b
NULL

$c
NULL

My goal is to not have that output, at all.

Update: my usage case is as follows. I'm using lapply() to pump out xtable() text and I'm sink()'ing it to an Rnw file. So this NULL output is bugging up my automation.

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3  
I wrap apply in invisible when I'm writing to sink. –  Roman Luštrik Jan 29 '12 at 20:04
    
Put that as an answer so I can checkmark it :) It's exactly what I was asking for. –  Brandon Bertelsen Jan 29 '12 at 20:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

two options come to mind:

Either

trash_can <- lapply(a.list, x)

or

invisible(lapply(a.list, x))

The first one makes me wonder if there is an analog of Linux's /dev/null in R that you can use to redirect stuff that you don't want. The only problem with creating the variable trash_can is that it will hang around and use up memory unless you rm(trash_can). But I don't think that's a problem here.

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invisible() as suggested by Roman, was exactly what I was looking for. –  Brandon Bertelsen Jan 30 '12 at 14:22

I think you might want to take a look at l_ply from the plyr package. It is supposed to return nothing, and it has all the properties of lapply, plus some more.

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You did

R> x <- function(x) { return(NULL) }
R> a.list <- list(a=1,b=2,c=3)
R> res <- lapply(a.list, x)
R> res
$a
NULL

$b
NULL

$c
NULL

R>

and as as you asked lapply to sweep over all elements of the list, you can hardly complain you get results (in res) for all elements of a.list. That is correct.

But what nice about the NULL values, though, is that it is trivial to have them skipped in the next aggregation step:

R> do.call(rbind, res)
NULL
R> 

So I've mostly used this approach of returning NULL when the data had an issue or another irregularity arose, as you can easily aggregate the 'good' results afterwards.

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No complaint about functionality. Just looking to get the results in a different way. Thanks for the pointer to do.call() –  Brandon Bertelsen Jan 30 '12 at 15:42

You could just do

a.list <- a.list[!sapply(a.list, is.null)]
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not trying to remove NULL elements from my list. I'm trying to stop the output from a function that returns NULL as shown above. –  Brandon Bertelsen Jan 29 '12 at 16:54
1  
I'm not sure it's possible to do that, short of replacing lapply with a loop and testing each result before incrementing the list. This will get you to the same endpoint, though. –  Hong Ooi Jan 29 '12 at 17:00
2  
Also sapply is dangerous to program with. –  hadley Jan 29 '12 at 18:32
    
@hadley why is that? My guess: because it might try to coerce a list into a vector that could cause problems? –  Xu Wang Jan 30 '12 at 4:39
1  
It's dangerous to program with because you don't know what output it will give you - this is typically problematic when the input is zero length. vapply is uniformly better. –  hadley Jan 30 '12 at 22:09

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