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A clearer version of this question have been post here.

I have defined a signature and two modules as follows. The reason to define 2 modules is that I may use MatrixArray or MatrixList according to the context...

module type MATRIX =
  sig
    type 'a t
    ...
  end

module MatrixArray =
  (struct
    type 'a t = 'a array array
    ...
  end: MATRIX)

module MatrixList =
  (struct
    type 'a t = 'a list list
    ...
  end: MATRIX)

Then I define another signature and another 2 modules which are related to MATRIX, MatrixArray and MatrixList:

module type PM =
  sig
    type 'a t
    (* val of_matrix: 'a MatrixArray.t -> 'a t *)
    val of_matrix: 'a MATRIX.t -> 'a t
    ...
  end

module PmArray =
  (struct
    type 'a t = 'a array array
    let of_matrix (m: 'a MatrixArray.t) : 'a t =
    ...
  end: PM)

module PmList =
  (struct
    type 'a t = 'a list list
    let of_matrix (m: 'a MatrixList.t) : 'a t =
    ...
  end: PM)

In the signature PM, I can define val of_matrix: 'a MatrixArray.t -> 'a t, but I can't define val of_matrix: 'a MATRIX.t -> 'a t (Error: Unbound module MATRIX). So I guess MATRIX.t is always illegal...

What i really want to realize is... on the level of signature, of_matrix: 'a MATRIX.t -> 'a PM.t, but on the level of module PmArray, of_matrix: 'a MatrixArray.t -> 'a PmArray.t; on the level of module PmList, of_matrix: 'a MatrixList.t -> 'a PmList.t.

I don't know if I have to define extra modules or functors to realize this structure... Hope my concern is well described, could anyone help?

Edit1:

I just realize that the name of of_matrix may be misleading, it would have been called just f for instance. It represents just a function of type 'a MatrixArray.t -> 'a PmArray.t or 'a MatrixList.t -> 'a PmList.t, its implementation may be complicated inside. And I would like to make its type 'a MATRIX.t -> 'a PM.t, which is unfortunately not allowed.

Edit2:

I would have called PM for instance TRIANGLE, and called PmArray TriagleArray (meaning a triangle represented by array of array), and called PmList TriangleList (meaning a triangle represented by list of list). Given a matrix m, the function f (m: a MatrixArray.t) : 'a TriangleArray.t gets its left top half part separated by the diagonal line.

At the current stage, functions like : 'a MatrixArray.t -> 'a TriangleList.t are not really necessary, though there is no reason to exclude them later... What I really need on the module level is : a MatrixArray.t -> 'a TriangleArray.t and : a MatrixList.t -> 'a TriangleList.t, and I just would like to have a common signature/constraint for them: 'a MATRIX.t -> 'a TRIANGLE.t somewhere.

share|improve this question
    
I am not sure, what you are trying to achieve with your design. The definition of the signature only defines a constraint on modules implementing that signature, but does not define a type. Hence your function type val of_matrix: 'a MATRIX.t -> 'a t is invalid. However I am not sure what you are trying to achieve so I am not sure what the correct solution to your problem would be. –  LiKao Jan 29 '12 at 19:27
    
Also note, that your current design will probably fail at later times, because MatrixArray.t is abstract in MatrixArray. Hence you will not be able to use it's internal implementation within of_matrix. This can also be remedied by using a functor. –  LiKao Jan 29 '12 at 19:30
    
The reason to define 2 modules is that I may use MatrixArray or MatrixList according to the context... I do not see your second comment... –  SoftTimur Jan 29 '12 at 19:50
    
The question was more to the point, as to why you need the signatures and why you are splitting your stuff into the Matrix and the Pm part, altough these seem to belong togehter from the code you provided. –  LiKao Jan 29 '12 at 20:07
1  
About the other comment: When you define your module MatrixArray to be of signature MATRIX the type 'a MatrixArray.t will become abstract. Hence simple equalities such as int array array = int MatrixArray.t will not hold any more outside of the module. This means you have to treat 'a PmArray.t and 'a MatrixArray as completely separate types. For example the implementation let of_matrix (m: 'a MatrixArray.t) : 'a t = m will not work, because here 'a t and a MatrixArray.t are refering to different types (although they have the same implementation). –  LiKao Jan 29 '12 at 20:09
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1 Answer 1

The main problem seems to be, that 'a MATRIX.t is not a type, so it cannot be used to build new function types. This means, that the declaration val 'a MATRIX.t -> 'a t is not a valid function definition.

Type signatures only define constraints on types. In most cases you will not need type signatures, because they can easily be infered from the modules themselves. The main reason to use type signatures is if you plan on functorizing your code later. In this case you need to define the type signature that you want to be using as input and output to your functor. All modules conforming to that signature will be allowed, no matter if they are actually of the mentioned type. OCaml really uses Duck Typing on the level of modules and objects.

So the simples solution would be to get rid of the module signature PM altogether. This will also reduce the amount of code which has no real semantics. If you really need the module signature (or are just playing around with modules currently).

Here is one possible solution to your problem:

module type MATRIX =
  sig
    type 'a t
  end

module MatrixArray =
  (struct
    type 'a t = 'a array array
    type 'a b = 'a
  end: MATRIX)

module MatrixList =
  (struct
    type 'a t = 'a list list
  end: MATRIX)

  module type PM =
  sig
    type 'a t

  end

module Pm  = functor ( M: MATRIX) ->
  (struct
    type 'a t = 'a M.t
  end: PM with type 'a t = 'a M.t ) 

module PmArray = Pm(MatrixArray)
module PmList = Pm(MatrixList)

Not that the with clause introduces a type equivalency between the parameter type 'a MATRIX.t (not really a type, but becomes one, once the functor is instantiated) and the resulting type 'a PM.t (again not really a type). Hence when instantiating the functor the necessary equalities will hold and your of_matrix function will not be needed.

However there might be other solutions which better suit your needs, for example just dropping the signatures and using the modules only.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comment... Please take a look at my Edit1 in OP... of_matrix is not a copy function, it could be complicated, so it can not be ignored... –  SoftTimur Jan 29 '12 at 20:43
    
So if I understand this correctly you want to be able to have a function, which can create a 'a PmArray.t from both a 'a ArrayMatrix.t as well as from a 'a ListMatrix.t and another function in the other module which can create a 'a PmList.t from both these types. I was under the impression you only wanted to create the PmXXX types from the corresponding MatrixXXX types. In that case the first questions would be: Which version of OCam are you using? In the newest version, there are several features, which might really be of interest to you. –  LiKao Jan 29 '12 at 21:00
    
Please take a look at my Edit2 in OP... –  SoftTimur Jan 29 '12 at 22:12
    
I have made a clearer version of the question here... By the way, As Pm and Matrix are really parallel, I don't think it is good to make one as functor of another... –  SoftTimur Jan 30 '12 at 0:17
    
By the way, my OCaml is the lastest verion... Thank you very much... –  SoftTimur Jan 30 '12 at 0:17
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