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I have client-server application, where server side is Azure WCF service with data in SQL azure database. Clients are Windows Phone 7 silverlight applications. Client and server communicate throught WCF. Server is providing data to client which are stored in Azure SQL database.

I recently ran to some problems with pooling. I was creating new object every time when client request arrived. I was not closing this connections and very soon encountered exception:

Timeout expired. The timeout period elapsed prior to obtaining a connection from the pool. This may have occurred because all pooled connections were in use and max pool size was reached.

My question is - how should connection object to DB be handled? Should i create one connection object for every client request or should i create singleton object which should handle all calls to db? IS it even possible - does not connection object time out after some time or something?

I am using SQLConnection object:

private static SqlConnection connection
        {
            get
            {
                SqlConnectionStringBuilder connectionStringBuilder = new SqlConnectionStringBuilder
                {
                    DataSource = DB_SOURCE,
                    InitialCatalog = DB_NAME,
                    Encrypt = false,
                    TrustServerCertificate = false,
                    UserID = DB_USER,
                    Password = DB_PASS,
                };
                SqlConnection c = new SqlConnection(connectionStringBuilder.ToString());
                c.Open();
                return c;
            }
        }

        public static void execute(String query)
        {
            try
            {
                SqlCommand com = new SqlCommand(query, connection);
                com.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
            finally
            {
                connection.Close();
            }
        }
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6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I agree with the answers provided by Wiktor Zychla, Tobias, and Herve Roggero. They explain that:

  1. Your getter (connect property), doesn't return the original SqlConnection that you were expecting, hence the original connection is not getting closed.
  2. You should create SqlConnections when you need them, keep them open only as long as you need them, and close them when you are done.

Here's a complete solution:

private static string _connectionString = string.Empty;

private static string connectionString
{
  get
  {
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(_connectionString))
    {
      _connectionString = new SqlConnectionStringBuilder
      {
        DataSource = DB_SOURCE,
        InitialCatalog = DB_NAME,
        Encrypt = false,
        TrustServerCertificate = false,
        UserID = DB_USER,
        Password = DB_PASS,
      }.ToString();
    }

    return _connectionString;
  }
}

public static void Execute(String query)
{
  using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
  using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(query, connection))
  {
    connection.Open();
    command.ExecuteNonQuery();
  }
}
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If i am using "using" like described above, i do not need to call connection.close(), right? –  Vojtech Ruzicka Feb 1 '12 at 14:57
    
Correct; using guarantees that connection.Close() gets called when it goes out of scope (w3enterprises.com/articles/using.aspx). In fact, I'm downvoting Wiktor's answer, because his code is bad! The point he makes is correct though. –  JohnB Feb 1 '12 at 21:55
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SQL connections are pooled by default. Therefore you should "create" them when you need them and destroy them when done. (Your code will be simpler if you use using rather than try/finally.)

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One connection per request is way too many connections. (the one extreme) Singleton connection is way too few connections.

What you need is to have a connection per user session. The easiest way to do that is by using IoC container, like Ninject and request your connection via the container.

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Right now i have no mechanism to maintain sessions. This wcf communication is more like fire and forget - each request is separate. Time between requests from one client can be between under second to many minutes. –  Vojtech Ruzicka Jan 30 '12 at 12:31
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The problem is that you are not closing the connection you used for the command but a new one you created just for closing it.

The body of your execute method should be as follows:

var con = connection;
try 
{ 
    SqlCommand com = new SqlCommand(query, con); 
    com.ExecuteNonQuery(); 
} 
finally 
{ 
    con.Close(); 
} 
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1  
You are still refering to the connection twice. The third line should be SqlCOmmand com = new SqlCommand(query, con);. –  Wiktor Zychla Jan 29 '12 at 18:26
    
Doh. Fixed, thanks. –  Nuffin Jan 29 '12 at 18:30
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You are referring to the connection twice in your code and because of that you have two different connections, as your getter always creates a new connection!

Thus, the latter is created and then immediately disposed but the former one is not closed.

Rewrite your code at least to:

public static void execute(String query) {
    SqlConnection c = null;
    try { 
      c = connection;
      using ( SqlCommand com = new SqlCommand(query, c);                 
         com.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
    finally {
       if ( c!=null)
         c.Close();
    }
} 
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This won't work since the getter of connection might throw an exception and then c would be anything, which is a state the compiler doesn't like, for obvious reasons... –  Nuffin Jan 29 '12 at 18:23
    
Right. The check would be nice. –  Wiktor Zychla Jan 29 '12 at 18:25
    
You are still not initializing c. And local variables aren't automatically set to the default value, so the compiler will still complain about the possibility of c not being initialized at first reading attempt (but the check for null is definitely not bad)... –  Nuffin Jan 29 '12 at 18:34
    
Don't have the compiler at hand thus I make basic omissions. –  Wiktor Zychla Jan 29 '12 at 18:57
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I agree with Oliver that you should create connections and close them every time; connection pooling will handle the rest for you. Also you should keep your connections open to a minimum amount of time. Closing your connections every time, as quickly as possible, and making sure your connection string is the same very time ensures your connection pooling strategy will work.

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