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I'm writing a small datafile that's a little bit like this

(top-section 1 "start of text"
  (link "bit of text")
  (link "bit of text 2"))

I want to use a macro to convert the above form and process it in my system, however I'm having trouble trying to work out how to get the link portion of the macro working properly. My link function is like this

(defn link [top-section-id link-text]
    ....)

As you can see this takes two arguments, however my defintion above only passes one argument. What I want to do is "transform" the data passed in via the DSL to inject the id of the top-section above into the link function.

So in reality it should convert the input to

(top-section 1 "start of text"
  (link 1 "bit of text")
  (link 1 "bit of text 2"))

How can I do this without the Clojure reader evaluating the code and throwing an error saying I've only passed one argument to the link function. Is there anyway of "escaping" the input so it doesn't evaluate until I've made the necessary transformations

I know I could just do

(top-section 1 "start of text"
  '(link "bit of text")
  '(link "bit of text 2"))

To get the list form back, but is there any other way?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could have top-section expand to a specially crafted let form binding the link symbol to a partial application of the original link function to the first argument of the top-section form:

(defmacro top-section [n s & forms]
  `(let [~'link (partial ~'link ~n)]
     (prn ~s) ; handle s in whichever way is appropriate
     ~@forms))

;; for the sake of example
(defn link [n s] (prn n s))

A REPL interaction (three lines printed, nil returned):

user> (top-section 1 "start of text"
        (link "more text")
        (link "still more"))
"start of text"
1 "more text"
1 "still more"
nil

If top-sections might need to nest, you could use a more complicated top-section which takes care to grab "namespace scope" link:

(defmacro top-section [n s & forms]
  (let [qlink (symbol (name (.. (resolve 'link) ns name)) "link")]
    `(let [~'link (partial ~qlink ~n)]
       (prn ~s)
       ~@forms)))

At the REPL:

user> (top-section 1 "start of text"
        (link "more text")
        (link "still more")
        (top-section 2 "inner section"
          (link "etc.")))
"start of text"
1 "more text"
1 "still more"
"inner section"
2 "etc."
nil

(A quite possibly completely unnecessary complication follows -- a configurable variant of top-section -- hopefully it's somewhat enjoyable if not useful...)

Incidentally, do you have a small, fixed set of functions you'll want to handle in this way or do you think it might expand / turn out to be large? In the latter case, you could have top-section perform the same thing for all symbols held e.g. in an Atom somewhere:

(def top-section-syms (atom #{'link}))

(defmacro top-section [n s & forms]
  (let [nsym (gensym "n")
        qs (for [s @top-section-syms]
             [s (symbol (name (.. (resolve s) ns name)) (name s))])]
    `(let [~nsym ~n
           ~@(->> (for [[s q] qs]
                    [s `(partial ~q ~nsym)])
                  (apply concat))]
       (prn ~s)
       ~@forms)))

At the REPL:

user> (swap! top-section-syms conj 'prn)
#{prn link}
user> (top-section 1 "start of text"
        (link "more text")
        (link "still more")
        (top-section 2 "inner section"
          (link "etc.")
          (prn "and another fn...")))
"start of text"
1 "more text"
1 "still more"
"inner section"
2 "etc."
2 "and another fn..."
nil

The operation of swap!ing in a new symbol could be prettified with a simple function / macro (register-top-section-symbol?).

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Wow great answer thanks, this was exactly what I was looking for! –  djhworld Jan 31 '12 at 21:30

If top-section is a macro, it gets the link forms unevaluated, so it can transform them in whichever way it wants.

I would suggest something different, though: Have the macro top-section evaluate its subforms in a context in which some dynamic variable is bound to whatever the corresponding argument to top-section was, and reference that from within the link function:

(def ^:dynamic *id*)

(defmacro top-section [id text & body]
  `(binding [*id* ,id]
     ...
     ~@body))

(defun link [text]
  ... *id* ...)
share|improve this answer
    
Do you think using a dynamic var for this case is the best option? I'm Clojure noob, however, and this seems like a bit of unnecessary incidental comlexity. –  MisterMetaphor Jan 29 '12 at 20:56
    
In reponse to your first sentence - is that really the case? I keep getting arity errors because I assume it's looking up the link function and then bailing out. I need those functions to be unevaluated until I've done the transformations –  djhworld Jan 29 '12 at 21:05
    
@e-i-s IMHO, using a dynamic variable introduces less complexity than doing magic transformations on code, since it does not tie the functionality to the exact data representation. Consider what happens when you wrap a link call within another function. The dynamic variable will still work. The code transformation will break. Tying things together that need not be is the very definition of incidental complexity, isn't it? –  Matthias Benkard Jan 29 '12 at 22:28
    
@djhworld Yes, it is. What does your macro do with the body forms? –  Matthias Benkard Jan 29 '12 at 22:34
    
@Matthias, good point. But when you use a variable to resolve top-section id in link calls, doesn't that tie your link function implementation to the macro? Also, what do you think about capturing the id symbol in the macro scope instead of having a namespace level var? –  MisterMetaphor Jan 30 '12 at 6:51

You could try this:

(defmacro transforming [& body]
  `(do ~@(map (fn xform [[f arg1 arg2 & more :as syms]]
                (if (= f 'top-section)
                  (apply list f arg1 arg2
                    (map #(if (= (first %) 'link)
                            (apply list (first %) arg1 (rest %))
                            (xform %))
                    more))
                  syms))
              body)))

And then use it like so:

(transforming
  (top-section 1 "start of text"
    (link "bit of text")
    (link "bit of text 2")
    (top-section 3 "nested"
      (link "nested sections should work too")))
  (top-section 2 "section two"
    (link "text")
    (link "text 2")))

Which will expand to:

(do
  (top-section 1 "start of text"
    (link 1 "bit of text")
    (link 1 "bit of text 2")
    (top-section 3 "nested"
      (link 3 "nested sections should work too")))
  (top-section 2 "section two"
    (link 2 "text")
    (link 2 "text 2")))

However this macro has a recursive call and I'm pretty sure it could be made far more beautiful.

share|improve this answer
1  
Code walking is generally recursive. There is nothing wrong with using recursion where it's the only thing that makes sense. :) –  Matthias Benkard Jan 29 '12 at 22:43

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